Received from the National Front for Nosferatu Rights

*I would like to point out I did NOT write this.  It showed up in my mailbox with pictures and the attribution I put in the title and the following email text: Among Snowden’s documents as captured by British Intelligence from Glenn Greenwald’s Main Squeeze “Miranda”.  I have no clue who sent it, though OF COURSE I have suspicions. (I am looking at YOU.) I find this message bewildering to say the least, but I’m not the one to pass up a guest post.  However it worries me a little… are you guys getting crazier than I? You know that’s not allowed, right?*

TOP SECRET //GCHQ/NSA/DGSE JOINT  SHAPESHIFTER TASK FORCE.…DECLASSIFICATION DATE 01AUG43

SURVEILLANCE FIELD NOTES // 30JUN13 THROUGH 30JUL13

SUPERVISING FIELD AGENT J. CAESAR

IN ACCORDANCE WITH GCHQ/NSA/DGSE JOINT SHAPESHIFTER TASK FORCE ORDER 12-003623 DATED 12NOV12, SURVEIL TEAM DELTA MOVED TO COLORADO DENVER METRO AREA ON 29JUN13 TO INVESTIGATE INTEL PROVIDED BY AGENT [REDACTED] REGARDING POSSIBLE LOCATION OF RUMORED “THE GEORGE”.

ON 06JUL13, LOCATED TWO LOCATIONS OF POSSIBLE SUSPECT DINER ON COLFAX AVENUE WHICH MATCHED DESCRIPTION OF RUMORED SHAPESHIFTER LOCATION AS DISCLOSED IN INTERROGATION OF CAPTURED [REDACTED] – SEE INTERROGATION NOTES FILE ID “THE GEORGE  FOLDER 12-00071223”. SEE PHOTOS MARKED “SURVEILLANCE PHOTO 1”, AND “SURVEILLANCE PHOTO 2” IN ATTACHED DATA ANNEX.surveillance photo 1

LOCAL UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES [DENVER POST ARTICLE DATED 05MAY12] ASSERTS THAT SUBJECT LOCATIONS ARE OWNED BY “PETE CONTOS” – ALLEGEDLY CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF OWNERSHIP OF NEIGHBORING “SATIRE LOUNGE” BAR, AS WELL AS LATER PURCHASED “PETE’S KITCHEN”, “PETE’S UNIVERSITY CAFÉ”, “PETE’S GREEKTOWN CAFÉ” (SEE PHOTO MARKED “SURVEILLANCE PHOTO 3”). SURVEILLANCE STRONGLY SUGGESTS THAT THESE LOCATIONS – PREFERENTIALLY “PETE’S KITCHEN” – ARE IN FACT THE RUMORED LOCATION “THE GEORGE”.  SECONDARY LOCATION “PETE’S GREEKTOWN CAFÉ” INCLUDED FOR COMPLETENESS OF REPORT BUT TRAFFIC ANALYSIS CONCLUDES ONLY 17% CHANCE THAT THE LATTER LOCATION IS “THE GEORGE” VERSUS 71% RELIABILITY THAT THE FORMER “PETE’S KITCHEN” WOULD MATCH THE AGGREGATE INTELLIGENCE.

surveillance photo 2

ARTICLE INCLUDES INFORMATION REGARDING THE “PETE CONTOS” ALIAS BACKSTORY, INCLUDING IMMIGRATION FROM TRIPOLI, GREECE IN 1955.  PHOTOS OF “PETE CONTOS” ARE INCLUDED IN ADDITION TO TESTIMONIALS OF “PETE CONTOS” COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT FROM LOCAL POLITICAL FIGURES.

IT IS UNCLEAR TO THIS INVESTIGATING TEAM HOW THE SUBJECT SHAPESHIFTER INDIVIDUALS PLACED THESE OBVIOUS FORGED ARTICLES INTO LOCAL PRESS ACCOUNTS TO OBSCURE THE TRUE OWNERSHIP OF THESE LOCATIONS. FURTHER INVESTIGATION WARRANTED TO UNCOVER ANY OTHER DEEP COVER SHAPESHIFTER AGENT(S).

DURING THE PERIOD OF THIS REPORT, SURVEILLANCE ASSETS WERE DEPLOYED AT THE SUBJECT LOCATIONS. SURVEILLANCE TEAM DETAILED REPORTS ARE FILED SEPARATELY IN THE ATTACHED FIELD NOTES ANNEX.  TO SUMMARIZE THOSE REPORTS: AGENTS OBSERVED A WOMAN WITH ONE SUSPICIOUS MALE AGED HER CONTEMPORARY AND TWO SUSPICIOUS MALES OF AGES APPROX 18 & 20 ARRIVE IN LOCATION IN A LATE MODEL HMMV LIMO CONVERSION.  THESE INDIVIDUALS MATCH THE DESCRIPTIONS OF PERSONS LABELED “HOYTS HUNS” IN COMMUNICATIONS INTERCEPTS.  SURVEILLANCE TEAMS REPORT, HOWEVER, THAT NO SHAPESHIFTER INDIVIDUALS WERE POSITIVELY IDENTIFIED. THE BACK PARKING LOT OF BOTH LOCATIONS WERE SURREPTITIOUSLY SEARCHED DURING 5 CONSECUTIVE EVENINGS, AND 4 CONSECUTIVE MORNINGS, AND NO SHAPESHIFTER INDIVIDUALS WERE OBSERVED. NO SIGNS OF ANY ALLIGATOR WERE NOTED BY ANY SURVEILLANCE TEAM.

NOTE HOWEVER THAT DURING OPERATIONS ON 25JUL13, ONE SURVEILLANCE TEAM OF TWO DISAPPEARED.  COMMUNICATIONS MONITORS RECORDED A BRIEF GARBLED TRANSMISSION FROM TEAM RADIO WHICH IS TRANSCRIBED BELOW:

“VOICE 1: WHAT’S THAT OVER THE CAR?  NO, FROM THE ALLEY.
VOICE 2:WINGS?  WHAT HAS WINGS LIKE THAT …”

RECOMMENDATION TO JOINT TASK FORCE IS TO CONTINUE SURVEILLANCE OF THESE LOCATIONS IN DENVER METRO AREA AND TO AUTHORIZE ISSUANCE OF INTERCEPTOR BODY ARMOR TO ALL FIELD TEAMS.

surveillance photo 3

173 responses to “Received from the National Front for Nosferatu Rights

  1. “TO AUTHORIZE ISSUANCE OF INTERCEPTOR BODY ARMOR TO ALL FIELD TEAMS.”

    UMMNMMM crunchy!

  2. Are you sure the NSA didn’t accidentally CC you?

  3. I thought we would get to learn the squirrel story.

    • It’s secret squirrel, so…..NO.

      • Squirrel tomorrow. It wore a berret and sang the Marseille. I swear. At least that’s how I remember it.

        • Hm. The ones I have known have mostly been thieves. Or saboteurs, most times we lose electricity here the culprit is said to be a squirrel. Usually a very thoroughly baked one at that point, so they do seem dedicated at least.

          • Baked, not fried? Diet squirrel!

            • You have never seen what thoroughly baked (by me) can look like.

              (Many years ago, when I was a student. I forgot I had something in the oven and went out for, er, a while, and was lucky I didn’t burn the apartment. Or that nobody called the fire department, I don’t think I would have liked what the landlord would have said if they had broken the door down or something. Lots of smoke, presumably no flames since it didn’t start a fire. Not much left of the food. I did get the smell out of the kitchen – fortunate also that it was mostly just the kitchen, the door had been closed – but it took a while and some very thorough scrubbing, repeated several times. Fortunately the walls and ceiling could be washed too, they were painted concrete or something similar, hard surface anyway. Have had the tendency to check things a lot before going out after that).

              • I have firsthand knowledge that an oven can contain a fire. And they close well enough well, electric ones, anyway) that after a while, the oxygen will be used up and the fire will go out.

                On the other hand, if you didn’t have the temp turned up above 400F (205C), it’s not likely to catch anything on fire unless it cooks over and gets combustibles onto the bottom of the oven.

                • As far as I recall the temperature was about 200 C, but since it was an old oven the real temp was probably lower, I had learned to use higher than recommended temperatures with it since the cookbook recommendations tended to leave food undercooked. But what was left of that food (I’m not quite sure what the English name for it would be, mostly some meat and potatoes in water?) was some black charred bits stuck to the bottom of the dish.

                  • Oh, that temp will cook off the volatiles and leave essentially charcoal, but it won’t ignite them.

                  • If the meat was in chunks, probably “stew.” (Never heard of one baked, but it makes sense with whole or large potatoes– I’d use a crockpot, not sure if that was an option.) If it was one or two pieces then “a roast with potatoes.”

                    Possibly “roasted meat and potatoes.” Depends on how much water.

                    • Growing up my mom used to occasionally roast meat, potatoes and carrots, just like you would a roast only with chunks of meat like you use in stew. I don’t know that we really called it anything, she would separate it out into different bowls when she put it on the table and we would just ask, “please pass the meat… please pass the potatoes” etc. Stew is served all together, with enough liquid to make it like soup, and I have seen it made in the oven, but prefer a crockpot myself.

                    • That was a common dinner in my household when growing up. Mom would put in the meat, potatoes, carrots, and onions. Sometimes celery. Then she would pour some canned cream soup over it (Cream of Mushroom or Golden Mushroom mostly), add a can full of water and cook it. The soup would be used as a gravy to put over the potatoes, which we often mashed individually on our plates.

                    • Okay, I looked at a couple of Finnish-English dictionaries, seems they think the translation for that food, what I learned to call ‘pata’ would be ‘casserole’, although it’s not what I get when I google for pictures of ‘casserole’. ‘Pata’ also means a deep cooking pan, often one made of cast iron, and you can make something like that food either in the oven or on the stove-top, or sometimes you start by first boiling some of the water off on the stove, then put it in the oven on low heat for a while. It’s some combination of veggies and potatoes – potatoes can be whole but also cut up – and chunks of some meat which has usually been fried at least a bit before going in (but it can also be made with fish, in which case it goes in raw, ‘pata’ is the generic name, lots of different versions), covered in water but packed tight so there isn’t that much water.

                      So, probably stew, then.

                      I usually make that kind of stuff on the stove, but I shared that apartment with a couple of other girls and the end result was that often most of the dishes had not been washed – and of course I was not going to start washing something dirtied by one of the others, no way. So, a deep ceramic oven pan since that was clean (fortunately also very cheap, it ended in the trash. The others happened also to be gone for a few days so I could get rid of the other evidence, like that smell, before they started coming back).

                      Laziness can cost you, less likely I would have forgotten about it if it had been on the stove and more visible. Although I have once also cooked eggs long enough that the water boiled off, but that time I was in the next room and took the earphones off right around the time the water was gone and started wondering about the funny noises. 🙂

                    • Don’t know why I didn’t mention it in the response to bearcat earlier, but that would be called a Pot Roast where I live. Usually it’s cooked long enough that the hot water has a chance to break down the meat enough so that it calls apart, because it’s a cooking method we use to make tough meat easier to eat.

                      Try replacing a half cup of the water with wine (even very cheap wine, if that’s all you can afford). YUM!

                    • Pretty sure any casserole you’d find pictures of online would be heavy on cheese and pasta– kind of like lasagna without the lumpy cheese and using small pastas instead of the strips. My folks always called “protein, carb and veggie in sauce” dishes “goulash” when I made them– baked, boiled or fried. (As far as I know, has as much to do with ‘real’ goulash as American pizza has to do with ‘real’ pizza.)

                      The dish sounds like it could be a ‘casserole dish’– if it was made of metal, it could be a dutch oven. (Those are usually cast iron here.)

                      This is cool, trying to translate cooking stuff!

                    • Yep.

                      Those casseroles mostly look like what gets called ‘vuoka’ here. It’s also both a food and the dish it’s made in, in this case one of those used only in the oven while ‘pata’ is something which can used either on the stove or both on the stove and in the oven. ‘Vuoka’ can be either deep or shallow and usually does not have a lid, and the material can be almost anything, ceramic, glass or some metal, including that cast iron.

                    • It sounds like what a friend of mine calls a Kugel or a Tzimmes, basically a meat and potato/barley/yam/noodle casserole with some sort of veggie and maybe dried fruit. Traditionally you could cook them over night in the bakers’ ovens, in a closed pot.
                      She had recipes from her grandmother, but was not willing to make them without some encouragement, so I got the recipes and cooked them up to encourage her. Very filling.

              • It’s actually quite difficult to start a fire outside direct contact with flame. I once went shopping with one of the electric stovetop elements on. Didn’t realize it until I set a box of groceries on the stove and started investigating why it was smelling like smoldering cardboard.

                • Oh, it’s very easy if you forget you had some cookover of something that had a high sugar content, then try to cook something later, without cleaning it first (I DID say I had firsthand experience). The heating element makes the air quite hot enough at that distance to ignite the stuff stuck to the bottom of the oven. But at the greater distance that most cooking is done, not so much.

                  • Gas or electric oven? Because I’ve run the electric oven plenty of times – even on the ultra-high temp clean cycle – without causing ignition. Even after baking pies. A good amount of smoke, and the lovely odor of sugar rending itself apart, but no fire.

                    • I learned the hard way that you never, ever cook a cherry pie without putting the pie plate on a cookie sheet. Especially not in an oven that had probably gone five years since it was last cleaned. My fingers ache just thinking about it.

                    • Mine was electric. I had something in the oven one day and had left the kitchen because it was going to cook for over an hour. When I headed back, there was a flickering light in the kitchen and when I looked around, there was a small fire burning merrily away in the bottom of the oven. There may have been grease involved, too, so that might make a difference. I just let it burn, and it went out in a couple of minutes.

                • Hm. Never really thought about that. When a house burns down and no other reason is found you pretty often do see these speculations that somebody had left the stove on, or a pet had jumped against it and turned it on, or something, at least if it seems the fire started from the general location of the kitchen.

                  • Far more likely is a breakdown in the electrical insulation. A dead short or, better yet, arcing will generate more than sufficient heat to ignite common household materials. That’s why building codes are so very strict on electrical requirements.

                    • I suppose something like that was what happened once in my previous apartment. Old house, wiring had never been completely redone, just repaired and added on, some seemed to be from the time the house had been built, 30’s. The wiring was not hidden but on top of the walls.

                      A wall socket started to smoke, I turned the electricity off from the master switch and screwed the socket off, then separated the two wires I found – they were hot and somewhat blackened – before turning the electricity back on. I also called the fire department before doing that, they said it should be okay. Took a couple of days before the landlord got the electrician there.

                      We also tended to blow some of the fuses our apartments shared if I and my next door neighbor happened to turn on several devices at the same time during the winter, especially during the colder winters. Heating was by electricity and/or the wood stoves in the apartments, and I used mine a lot in winters partly because of that, I hated having to change those fuses.

                • I’ve had small flare-ups from stuff spilling over.

                  In one case, it’s the reason I totally clean the stove before using it in a new house. What were they cooking, nail polish?!?!?

          • Ours are at war with the rats.

            I prefer the squirrels, they don’t usually poo on my van’s engine. (yes, really)

        • Squirreling away future posts, eh? That’s just nuts.

      • “Squirrel?”
        Now you sound like my dog.

  4. This reminds me of one of my pet peeves – the disappearance of the classic diner. You can’t get more classic than Pete’s, which has the complete atmosphere.

    But they are rarer. And a shame because its one of the few truly pure American inventions. (Sure Montreal has Restaurant des Princesses d’Hochelaga or at least had – but diner food and topless waitresses don’t really mix).

    A mile or so from Pete’s on Colorado & 7th is Snooze with a pretentious menu, intentionally loud interior and constant large crowd waiting outside – I am saddened by the debasement of our culture.

    • I like diners. I fell in love with them when I first came here.

      • Would you agree with me that they are purely American?

        • Oh yes. Part of the reason I love them.

          • Have you ever eaten at Steak n’ Shake? They started (IIRC) as a diner and still have the diner-like setting. I’ve enjoyed eating there.

            • We went to the Steak n’ Shake once in Charlotte, NC. It caught fire, then there was a knife fight in the parking lot, and then the police tried to arrest us because one of the people in the parking lot said we and these people we’d just met “had started it.”
              I haven’t gone back.

              • Sounds like you had a great time. I love a good fight for breakfast.

              • Are you sure that wasn’t the Waffle House near [redacted]? ‘Cuz I think their larking-lot lease included a stabbing every other week.

                • And in that neighborhood, a stabbing was a lark compared to some of the other things that went on, at least until the “gritty artist” types started moving in.

                • I miss Waffle House.

                  • Next time use a ‘scope.

                    • no, I’m serious, nearest one is in Phoenix

                    • I understand FEMA is readying regulations to require Waffle House franchises in all areas subject to natural catastrophe — it appears to be the only way FEMA is can triage in emergencies. Without Waffle Houses FEMA cannot determine the impact of a storm and the likely scale of assistance required for disaster recovery.

                  • Birthday girl

                    God bless Waffle House and may their business prosper! Waffle House was the only place on the planet open for business one horrible terrible very bad no good Christmas Day when our family was racing 6 hours from my in-laws’ place to get home to a broken furnace … the children were tiny and still limited in what they could/would eat … after a desperate search for somewhere to buy food, we stumbled into Waffle House where the staff ebulliently wished us Merry Christmas and waited upon us as though it were their privilege to do so … and the kids loved their pancakes … God bless Waffle House!

              • There’s a Steak n’ Shake up the street from where I work in my day job. On those occasions when I go out for lunch by myself, or when, for whatever reason, both school and daycare are closed and I have my daughter with me, that’s where we go.

                Nice place. They don’t balk at serving me a double-bacon cheeseburger with no bun.

                What really sucks is that they make some pretty good shakes and I can’t have any.

              • Okaaay . . . they probably didn’t want you back either. 😉

                On Sat, Aug 31, 2013 at 11:04 AM, According To Hoyt wrote:

                > ** > accordingtohoyt commented: “We went to the Steak n’ Shake once in > Charlotte, NC. It caught fire, then there was a knife fight in the parking > lot, and then the police tried to arrest us because one of the people in > the parking lot said we and these people we’d just met “had started ” >

              • There’s a Steak n shake in Plano that’s very nice.

              • Sounds like my kinda place 🙂

                • You’d probably like Pete’s Kitchen. Honestly, it’s much reformed now, though if you go in at three am (I can’t for the life of me now remember WHAT in heck Robert and I went up for at that unholy hour. Had to do with some friend, of course, since nothing is open at that time? Or maybe it was a soire at a museum. It was… three? years ago? Anyway, we went by there of course, because DUH you go to Denver, you get Pete’s, even if you grab takeout and then put it in fridge for breakfast when you get home) you’ll still find the local… er… trade. (Prostitutes, at least, drug deals sometimes in parking lot, both okay if you just walk past and ignore.) BUT when we started going there, when Robert was little, the booths were old cracked linoleum, and the walls were grease-stained. Food was great, though, and since policemen ate free there, it was safe, even in the middle of a skivvy zone. So — we kept going there. Now the area is rather gentrified but still colorful, they have new booths, the place has been repainted. I’m not sure how I feel about the marble tiled bathroom, which is the latest innovation and seems rather out of place, but I suppose it’s easier to hose down. Food is still good.

                  • Good food and crap decor trump great decor and mediocre food.

                    • Like the inverse law of Chinese food: the more “Chinese” the decor and the more round-eyes on the staff, the worse the food. Plain decor and the waiter needs an interpreter? Sign me up for seconds. (Thai place around the corner from Texas Tech. Oh, man oh man is it good.)

                    • There used to be a place that carried “Japanese” food in a food court near where I work that was staffed by Mexicans. Food was all right, but I never got over shaking my head as I walked away from that one. The one two doors over that served “Cajun” food was the same way. I sometimes suspect they were owned by the same group. Oh, well. I could get edible, if not awesome, food there in good quantity for a decent price. Wish the building owners hadn’t sent everyone packing.

                    • I remember a Chinese place that I used to eat at, just normal restaurant décor, except for the homemade hot sauce that looks like Scarlet Oil with crushed red peppers in the bottom, and soy sauce alongside the salt and pepper. Owned by an Asian couple, the main cook was the man, would have another couple people helping in the kitchen, usually Asian, no idea but suspect they were probably related. The waitresses were white. But then we were in an extremely white bread town, the Mexicans had moved in last I was there, but they were the only little brown people with a significant presence. Excellent food! The cook was fabulous and would make anything you wanted, on the menu or not, or change items on the menu to however you requested them. Not sure how he always got it right, since he didn’t speak English (the waitresses couldn’t talk to him, he could barely understand them, much less talk back) but apparently he could read what they wrote on the ticket good enough. The wife came out and talked to me for over half an hour one night, through gestures I figured out she had seen me that day, in the whole conversation I understood two words “‘A’ road” and “blackberries”, I was on the ‘A’ road that day but have no idea if she was picking blackberries, thought I was picking blackberries, or was asking if the blackberries were ripe. I just nodded and smiled, and told her to tell her husband thanks the food was great.

                    • We have an “Asian Buffet” down the road that looks like someone went nuts with $300 in a chinatown dollar store— but if you look careful, you suddenly notice about a third of the stuff is crazy high quality. I think everybody grabbed their show-off stuff from home and put it on the walls, then filled in the blanks. The folks who run it (probably part of our Vietnamese community, or maybe Korean, but hire any first/second gen Asian immigrants that have the right attitude, which is odd but awesome)

                      I love their food– it’s a lot like the stuff we got when we were in Japan! (So, really good Denny’s equivalent. Not bad at all for a buffet. And the waitress ladies always coo over the kids, and seem to genuinely mean it.)

                  • 3AM is best for seeing Denver PD show up with their “girlfriends”.

            • Real milkshakes, etc. Don’t get there too often, but they’re good.

              On Sat, Aug 31, 2013 at 10:37 AM, According To Hoyt wrote:

              > ** > Paul (Drak Bibliophile) Howard commented: “Have you ever eaten at Steak > n’ Shake? They started (IIRC) as a diner and still have the diner-like > setting. I’ve enjoyed eating there.” >

    • You want diners? Come to NJ – it is the classic NJ thing. There are probably 10 of them within a couple of miles of my house in Hamilton.

      Some of them have been there for ages. Half of them (if not more) are run by Greek families. Which means, in addition to everything else, piles of Greek pastries.

      MMM baklava.

        • Pulled pork Southern style barbecue. Biscuits ‘n gravy. Actual, cooked on an honest-to-G*d grill mouthwatering juicy steaks. Homemade apple pie. Burgers made from fresh handmade patties, veggies not a day from the farm. Blackberry cobbler. Fried chicken that puts KFC and all those wannabies to *shame.*

          All within easy driving range of my little mountains in Southern Appalachia. Diners, we got.

        • I think I’d go the other direction, and put scrambled eggs on a gyro.

      • It’s been a couple of decades since I’ve been to Greece but I do remember…

        I also petted a wolf there (well, the ladies who owned him insisted he was, and he certainly did look like one, it just didn’t occur to me one might be kept as a pet. I doubt it would be possibly now, even there). There was this nice doggie in a very thoroughly fenced enclosure in the yard of a stable where we went for a horseback ride, and just barely big enough holes in the chain link fencing that I could scratch the fellow through the holes. Before the owners came out of the building. Nice guy, but I wish there had been a plaque on the fence. ‘Do not pet the wolf’. 😀

        And yes, never ask for a very placid horse either. Mine refused to keep up with the others no matter what I did until he noticed they were getting out of sight. _Then_ he started to run.

        • “I also petted a wolf there (well, the ladies who owned him insisted he was, and he certainly did look like one, it just didn’t occur to me one might be kept as a pet. I doubt it would be possibly now, even there”

          Nonsense! Just be prepared. They insist on sleeping on the waterbed.

          • And if you have no waterbed?

            • Couch will do

                • They are the sweetest babies, but they are not dogs. They’d never cross you in your presence but leave the room and they’ll take the pot roast right off the table and make it disappear in 30 seconds. You can’t train them otherwise. Unclaimed food is fair game. Can’t let them run loose either. they kill and eat everything.

                  • Heh. Why I got a bit nervous after I heard: I wasn’t somebody that wolf knew, and I am under the impression that they won’t necessarily be friendly in that case. I suppose not showing any nervousness or fear is good though if you meet one?

                    • They are actually excellent judges of people. Even better than dogs.
                      Provided they aren’t a wacked out hybrid of course. They don’t care if you are afraid just how nice you are. Seriously!

                    • interesting. We once attended a meeting in a house where our then two year old was allowed — no, encouraged — to play with the “dog” — we didn’t find out till we were ready to leave she was a purebred wolf. She was perfectly gentle and nice with Robert — but most animals are.

                    • The folks I know who prize wolf-blood in their animals say it can be a bit of a gamble– but those willing to act when they find out they’ve got a dangerous animal will have good animals.

              • Dorothy Grant

                Aww….. tell me, did the drifts of fur reach higher than the couch, once spring hit and they blew their coats?

                • Oh indeed! They have 3-4 different coats and change them continuously. You get used to it.

                  • Dorothy Grant

                    Heh. I see your mound of snow outside the window, and I think to myself, Self, do you miss the Alaskan winter yet? No? Southern heat hasn’t driven you insane yet, then.

                    I’m used to the wolf hybrids being strictly outdoors, as the few I met were hyperactive, and very destructive when bored. And aggressive toward strangers, though that wasn’t a bug, that was a feature when Sascha was sitting on the dock guarding the equipment as the salvage diver’s down below making welds on a hull. Besides, if you wore welding leathers to play with her, it wasn’t much different than a hyperactive malamute.

                    • Sometimes it gets to the top of the window but it’s shed off the roof.

                      In my limited experience, we’ve had three, one very little, one mostly and the third purebred, plus known a few others with different guardians, the hybrids are pretty unpredictable. I think it’s crossed signals. The purebreds are very calm and loving with family and absolutely intransigent with strangers. The one pictured on the stairs was trapped in the wild as a pup and went through hell with various idiots until she came to us. She passed a few years ago. She was very maternal and would adopt babies of any species. Muishwin.

                      I don’t wrassle with any of them 🙂 but they all respond best to a growl as a no, and very little else. It’s all about pack hierarchy with them.

                  • Ever consider finding someone to spin it?

                    I’ve heard some families have matching sweaters of wolf fur.

        • There used to be a guy who’d walk his pet wolf on the beach at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina . . . . Interesting owner (a musician), seemed like a nice wolf, but I was very aware that the wolf had the potential to be not nice.

    • “diner food and topless waitresses don’t really mix”

      We require photographic proof of this assertion.

      • Not sure whether anyone can actually prove that I visited Restaurant les Princesses d’Hochelaga on my last trip to Montreal. Everyone refers to it as being next to the Olympic Stadium – but the stadium is a complete dump, baffles me why its a tourist attraction – I have a better time visiting junkyards. More to my taste, its near the botanic gardens which are spectacular. I have heard that Montreal finally forced them to cover up.

        At any rate, no photos for you.

        • “Everyone refers to it as being next to the Olympic Stadium – but the stadium is a complete dump, baffles me why its a tourist attraction – I have a better time visiting junkyards. ”

          I have a better time visiting junkyards than a lot of places, you never know what kind of hidden treasure you will stumble across in a junkyard.

          • Jeeps always need parts.

            • That is exactly why I will never own a Jeep.

              • You just need one with fewer fiddly parts.
                I’ve almost replace them all in this one.

                It’s a 75

                • I used to have a Grand Wagoneer full size. Great rig.

                  • we did too. Got killed. In front of our house. Middle of the night. Some drunk in a corvette crashed into the back.

                  • I always preferred Fords, but I’m pretty impressed with it.
                    Goes almost anywhere.

                    • I have driven a Ford Expedition, bought used with around 50k miles, for 15 years now. (I think the car is close on to 20 years old.) It’s now developing some quirks, though probably none unfixable, though it’s on that edge where you have to think “Is it worth to spend x on it, if it’s only worth y?” Mind you, we don’t have x to spend on it, so this is academic. But supposing I become a bestseller or make a lot of money indie. Would it be worth it? I mean, on one hand it is an OLD car. On the other hand it’s been an absolute trooper, and if we buy a “new” (meaning new to us, we always buy used and drive into the ground) car, will it be as good?

                    • I’d like to help but it’s hard to say. 😦
                      I’d be inclined to keep it, were I thee but…..I wouldn’t have bought it in the first place. I don’t buy anything with a computer on board beyond electronic ignition. None of them are worth more than a few hundred- scrap price. We buy 60s and 70s cars and sometime up to 80s trucks, all fords in which the parts are as interchangable as legos. If a body dies, I take off the good stuff and scrap the rest, or just stick it out back as a parts car.

                      None of this works out well unless you do the work yourself AND are willing and able to rearrange your schedule to include an overhaul to get back on the road. All part of a lifestyle choice.

                      The Jeep is a departure to the extent that we don’t have any parts but even so… It was a 500$ purchase that I’ve gone completely through in the last 5-6 years including welding in an entire new floor to reattach the body to the frame, rings, bearings and valve train and just about every other moving part in the thing. It still needs rocker panels (which I’ll have to buy and weld on) and now brake pads again. Heater core to put in before winter etc. It never ends but not counting time, I’ve only got about 1000$ total into it, maybe a little more. Pretty good spread over 6 years and the insurance is dirt cheap.

                      We also get to drive cool cars.
                      64.5 mustang
                      69 torino gt
                      68 t-bird
                      70 stepside
                      various 60-70s broncos
                      stuff like that
                      Not to mention my truck is always quicker than any little new hotrod that somebody’s mom bought for them 🙂

                      sorry

                    • “if we buy a “new” car, will it be as good?”
                      Oh yeah. Probably not!

                    • I don’t buy new cars because my family thought Scots were wasteful spendthrifts. But I especially don’t buy expensive vehicles, given where I take ’em in hunting season. (If you can get it out in less than an hour, it wasn’t truly “stuck”…..) I usually drive ’em until the wheels come off… not always figuratively. A few years ago, I scrapped a Mercedes Benz 380SE, because a new engine would have cost 2.5X what I paid for it. I miss it because I love the S class MB sedans. The W126 Mercedes looked like Mercedes. Maybe I will look for a 420SEL or a 560SEL in good shape.

                    • I have a friend, who doesn’t drive (lifestyle choice), who has four old Mercedes sedans in prime condition in his garage. He figures them as an investment. I’m not familiar with Mercedes models but they are the old ones that still looked like rolling iron.

                      He might sell one as he’s hard up for heating oil at the moment. Are you anywhere near Maine?

                    • Maine? I thought people only lived in Maine in Stephen King novels.

                    • We do!

      • Obviously he didn’t try the lox & cream cheese.

    • When i was in SF for GDC, I discovered a diner two blocks form my hotel. Diner style food, prices kinda high (hey, downtown SF…) but omg the food was good

    • SPQR | August 31, 2013 at 10:42 am
      > This reminds me of one of my pet peeves – the disappearance of the classic diner.

      Don’t get me started — up here, it’s impossible to find “gringo food”; everything is some form of Oriental food, or Mexican.

  5. It’s always fun to see stuff about Pete’s Kitchen. My in-laws used to own it waaaaay back in the day.

  6. … are you guys getting crazier than I? You know that’s not allowed, right?

    I do not know about the rest of this lot, but I looked up the definition of sanity in The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and all it had was my picture. So, based on available evidence I would reject your thesis and offer the antithesis: Hegel No!

  7. There has been a serious decline of places that serve country fried steak made with cube steak, hash browns, and sausage gravy in my neck of the woods.
    The closest one bought out a steakhouse and went upscale, and the best one went out of business.

  8. I realized that I’d probably never get fully used to living in the upper Midwest when I stopped at a diner in Kingfisher, OK on my way from [Redacted] Iowa to visit my folks in Texas. I sat down at the counter (white Formica with flecks in it and a few ciggy burns) and an older gal came up, popped her gum, and asked, “What’ll yew have, Hun?” And all I could think of was “Thank G-d, I’m home!”

    Oh, and my associate who was nowhere near Denver buying cattle in June says he’s heard that some stringy people were caught trying to steal grease from behind Pete’s Diner. I think he means “stingy” instead of “stringy,” but I could be wrong.

    • Boulder hippies trying to fuel a diesel VW Golf. If they apply for a visa they are allowed out of Boulder county on foraging missions. “Stringy” could have been more descriptive, assuming your associate unfamiliar with white people in dreadlocks.

    • depends on whether they tasted them. and I’ve seen grease thieves there.

      • He pleads either the Fifth or a fifth. 😉 Sometimes it’s better not to ask for clarification.

    • 1. Grease thieves. What a sheltered life I’ve lived.

      With the help of Google, I’m learning a lot here.

      2. Selling used grease strikes me as an example of the ingenuity of the free market. Hopefully restaurants are doing it for profit, and not to offset the cost of government regulation of disposal.

      • It wasn’t terribly long ago (15-20 years) that you could pull up outside a McWendy King with a drum and they’d be glad to let you take away their old grease. Occasionally they’d pay you because it saved them disposal costs. Then all the hippies and cheapskates got wind of biodiesel and the value of the commodity went up. Now I’ve heard in some places it’s cheaper to buy unused vegetable oil at Costco.

        None of this is surprising when you realize that both the gasoline and Diesel engines were designed to operate on cheap refining by-products.

        Applying the above to the future economics of electric vehicles is left as an exercise for the reader.

        • Dorothy Grant

          Not just the hippies and the local cheapskates – McDonalds UK now recycles all their oil and runs most of their delivery fleet on it. After all, it gets them green points, (probably with tax credits), and it removes disposal costs as well as insulating against the price spikes of petrol.

          McDonalds US contracts with a company to do much the same – they have bulk (tanker) oil delivery and removal. The contractor then sells the bulk used oil to refineries “and other vendors.” With enough economy of scale, hobbies become commodities.

          I find it fascinating to watch commodities be flooded with small producers – like with homebrewing beer regulations being relaxed, which took the industry from a few major corporations and some regional brewers to an explosion of homebrewers, and then back toward many smaller and regional competitors along with the large companies. (I wonder if the publishing industry, instead of looking at the music industry, could draw useful lessons for surviving massive change from Coors and Miller?)

          So, too, with biodiesel, soap/lotion companies, farmer’s market level farming, gun parts (have you seen how many tiny companies thrive on upgrading bits of 1911’s and AR’s? It’s amazing!) … and, of course, book publishing.

          I don’t know if book publishing will follow the consolidation route – whether it will consolidate into lots of small and regional publishers handling the publishing end for writers, or whether it will turn into lots of businesses offing options a la carte. Interesting times!

          • Yes, but to refine it into biodiesel acceptable to sell in a gas station actually cost more per gallon than diesel (which incidentally is a byproduct of making gasoline if I recall correctly) and is energy inefficient. Of course our tax dollars subsidize it because it is green* so that causes it to be profitable.

            *All on-road diesel is green, but some of it is taxed to death, while other is subsidized.

            • I’ve got about ten gallons of used Vegetable oil was saving to give to any greenie who was industrious enough to make his own biodiesel, but now it’s gone all corporate, so I don’t know how to get rid of it.

              • Try Craig’s list. You’re unlikely to get predators with something like “Used veggie oil, free to take away!”

                (We recently sold our van that way– got a hundred more than we expected, day after I finally put it up. After MONTHS of having it on sale.)

      • Yeah, my first thought was why steal it, most restaurants/gas stations with a deep fryer are happy to give you their used grease. Of course no one I know tries to burn it in their diesel, they just use it as bear bait.

  9. Seems like you have a fan.

  10. Note to self: do better job of disguising your locations. Especially if you eat there.

    M

  11. When the whimsy takes me, I drive around the back roads of Central Massachusetts, looking for the New England that Lovecraft wrote about.

    Which could be a really idea if I ever find it.

  12. Darn National Front for Nosferatu Rights, always stealing thunder from the Front for National Nosferatu Rights, and the lesser known Society For The Preservation of the Life Impaired.

    • Rob Crawford

      Splitters!

      (Seriously, some of them can transform into swarms of bats.)

    • Enough is enough!—

      1. We of the Noble and Ancient Order of True Nosferatu™ condemn the interspecies perversions practiced by the Uncle Dracs of the self-styled ‘National Front for Nosferatu Rights’ and its running dogs. (Mmm, dogs! Heeere, puppy puppy…) It is not the place of food to grant “rights” to the beings which consume it.

      2. To the humans:

      You lived in contentment under our wise and benevolent oversight until you succumbed to the wiles of malicious outside agitators. Avoid the retribution of KaliGaia and return to your proper place in the Natural Order immediately! First, for your transgressions, you owe us reparations.

      In blood, of course…it is a good year for Italiian O-…

  13. Body armor indeed! All they need is a good terrier dog that’ll ferret out any non-humans around and put the tooth too ’em! A sure cure.

    Dunna mess wi Scotland!

  14. We’re just lucky that there aren’t vampires for OTHER bodily fluids. That could get gross REALLY quickly.

    Worst of all being the Mucous vampire – NOSEferatu.

  15. OK, I didn’t get any exercise yesterday, but I got 2500 words written. And the plumber returned. And then I got an 0345 phone call from Germany. (The gent got the time conversion backwards. He’s 84, so I’ll forgive him.)

    • Is that good? I’m just getting started and 2000 words in a day is exhausting. Worse than splitting wood. It was fun though.

      • It ain’t John Ringo on a cold night good, but each author must find their own level. What matters most is doing it consistently, working your ceiling higher and, most importantly, typing the only two words that really count: The End.

      • I consider 2000 words OK, 5000 is better, and if I can get 7000-8000 done I’m cookin’ with gas. Yesterday was family day, with plumbing interruptions, so I was surprised to find that I’d gotten that much done. I’ve done 10,000 words in a day in fiction and that’s about my physical limit. For non-fiction I can get 5000/day, unless I’m having to do the footnotes at the same time. Then it gets really ssssllllllooooooooooowww.

    • No walk for me yesterday either. Too muggy.

      I did finish a complete pass through the calculation, though. As I wrote out the expressions in the total, the effect I hoped to find appeared. Then it appeared again. With the opposite sign.

      • Have you considered having someone check your figures? I’m pretty sure you could find people who would operate under Non-Disclosure terms. Anything that requires weeks, if not months, of setting up formulas (if I have been interpreting the things you’ve said about it correctly) seems like it would be prone to errors. I know that if it’s something new, it can be difficult to convince someone that what you’re trying to do makes sense, but I also know that finding out, after you’re all done, that there was something you missed somewhere in the middle can be devastating if you get all the way to testing a working model before you find it.

        • That’s a good thought, thank you. I’ll keep it in mind. However, for the time being:

          1a. I have a specific mechanism in mind. It’s not purely a matter of trial and error.

          1b. The purpose of doing the math is to exhibit the effect—or lack thereof—in a transparent way. I will check the calculations via numerical computation before drawing final conclusions.

          1c. Upon reflection, it seems reasonable that the hypothesized effect should not be there in the model I chose. Is it subtle, or is it nonexistent? (Or subtly nonexistent?) The issue becomes whether the model can be suitably reconfigured.

          2. A long time ago I used to collaborate successfully, but not so much in the last 20+ years. I’ll omit the details, but, to repeat, your point is worth keeping in mind.

          3. Even if I’m not chasing rainbows, it’s way too soon to talk about experiments.

          4. A lot of kooks are running around with Big Ideas that are wrong and/or discredited, and I might be one of them. The very thing I’d always regret not having tried is what I’ll very likely regret having wasting my time on. It is what it is.

          • I understand and sympathize completely. I have had several ideas that I simply didn’t have money to pursue, and some of them came on the market later, and a couple that didn’t work out the way i wanted them to. Right now, I have three that I’m going to try to get crowd funding for, but I have to finish the website I’m working on first. Because I seldom finish anything.