Something’s Happening Here

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Lately I’ve been having heretical thoughts. Thoughts I’d have dismissed out of hand a couple of years ago.

For someone who grew up in the seventies and where I grew up, we’re living in very strange times.

People are rising up. All over the world. In Iran, they’re rebelling against the mullahcracy. In Hong Kong those poor kids lasted much longer than we expected, and the media could not keep them quiet. In France the Yellow Jackets go on despite media blackout.  In Holland and Germany (Germany!) the farmers are taking to the streets with their tractors. And yes, in the US the Tea Party though reviled, lied about and infiltrated arguably started it all, and arguably had the greatest influence in growing the sullen resistance of the people.

In fact, judging by the sales of gun and ammo the one thing Americans haven’t done is quiet down. Also judging by how many houses we looked at a couple of years ago that had elaborate survival schemes, we’re not confident everything will be well. And we’re certainly not confident on anyone to protect us. Partly, of course, because we no longer trust our governments or those so called elites. Which is partly — in the US — traceable to the net and the existence of a complete, parallel system of information.

I realized as I was about to type this paragraph that I actually don’t know if this is true in the Asian countries, because — you know — my direct contacts there are free. However with that caveat, in the west it’s easy to presume that the unrest is caused by the internet, by access to other forms of information, even by the ability to contact people across the world for practically no cost. However I’m going to tell you right now and right here that this does not apply in Europe. Sure, they took to the net like a duck to water for all the things we initially took to the net for: recipes, mommy blogs, pictures of grandkids and, of course porn.

What they don’t have is political blogs, alternate news blogs, places where heretical views are spoken or any of that.

Now, if you say “It’s because they have different laws” I’ll say “Sure, whatevs. But they had different — and more repressive — laws before, and it was more expensive to get ahold of the equipment, and yet people still did and had pirate radio stations and what not. Also this is not China, you know, they should be able to get hold of ways to anonymize themselves.

Now, it’s possible it’s just a lag-time. Europe usually lags ten to twenty years behind the US, even when the same tech is available, possibly because we culturally (maybe genetically, but there’s no proof of that) have a tendency to be innovators who jump on things first. Maybe in ten or fifteen years Europe will be a forest of contentious blogs.

Anyway — they have the unrest, even without the blogs — and you know what’s weird? Outright unbelievable for those of us who grew up in the seventies: No communists.

Oh, sure, Europe has black block and antifa. And they’ve managed to enmesh themselves with the yellow jackets — France, what’s up with them, even? — but they are not the majority or — except by college professors — considered a spontaneous movement.

Look, through black-lives-matters and the pussy hatted spectacles, and now with antifa, you don’t even have to dig very deep, or very far to see beneath the surface the money flowing in, from chartered buses to identically printed signs, to–  It’s Soros all the way down.  Which is like turtles, only malevolent, soaked in the sins of the 20th century, and either trying to avenge himself on the world for the Holocaust that stole his childhood, or seeking redemption for the things he did then and continued to do to enrich himself, in all the wrong ways. I don’t know which, and I doubt he does.

But one malevolent man can cause a lot of strife, and he can convince a lot of idiot women that the most important thing in the world is to wear a pussy hat and hit the streets to protest against whatever the hell they’re protesting against today. But it’s also obvious that it’s taking no root: Antifa only acts truly horribly in safe (to them) places like California, Oregon, the lefty East coast and France.

What we aren’t seeing is any kind of vast, clamorous, pro-communist movement, in any of these protests. No, the communists are at the other end of it, in universities and usually in government and bureaucracy, wondering why “can you hear the people rising” is not in their favor, why the world isn’t coming to them to finally crown them as rulers of the world in the bestest system evah.

So what is going on?  And this is my heretical thought: the world is returning to normal.

I confess part of this thought came from D Jason Fleming’s article yesterday. When he mentioned the domino theory, it reminded me of how it looked, back then, in the past: every revolution, every single uprising, red flags would come up, and the ridiculous shouts about “The people, United.”  And if you’d seen a few of these — thanks to Portugal I’d seen a few — you could recognize the signs on TV when they showed others.  For instance, why in hell would both the Portuguese and the Iranian revolutions wave red carnations?  And why the shouts of “The people, united, shall never be defeated” the exact same shouts in Iran, Portugal, in the various revolutions in Africa and South America in that time? And why was there a sameness to the signs?

It wasn’t anything you could point out and say “here’s proof” and DEFINITELY it was nothing you could point to people who wanted to believe. But like with the antifa demonstrations, if you saw a few of them you started getting a feeling “This is not a spontaneous uprising. This is a part of a corporate machine that creates revolutions.”

My heretical thought is that the feeling was right.

Look, it’s not even that heretical. There are books out showing how much money the USSR poured into fomenting revolution abroad.  A country with a GDP between 2 and 4% what the US had spent most of its money fomenting revolution.  This was well advised of course, because the only wealth coming in — and boy, were they broke — came from leeching from other countries that fell under their sway.  And “communist” countries of course went to the USSR because by then they’d become convinced — or their elites had — that the US was out to get them. And got stripped.  What the Russians (it was always the Russians, even when their extended empire was the USSR) did to Africa is unprintable. And mostly they did it by using Cubans as shock troops.

But what if that was all of it? All there was? What if communism really was and remains a theory so stupid that only overeducated intellectuals believe in it unless they’re being pushed, bullied, paid by trained professional agitators to buy into the illusion?

What if the entire idea that communism appeals to the dispossessed, latches on when there is a great inequality, and somehow is part of a dark current in the human mind is completely wrong?

In other words, what if the Domino theory is right, but not in the way we thought in the seventies? What if it wasn’t “They see the other countries rise, and join in” but rather “As soon as the Soviet Block (What we should actually call Black Bloc) absorbs another country, they have some solvency to pour into fomenting revolution in another country?”  And thus the hydra grew.

There is some — slight — proof of this.  Take the French revolution. It was crazy in ways that communism is crazy. Actually exactly the same, including being run by batshit crazy intellectuals.  But it didn’t spread.

Oh, sure, okay, there were “republican” revolutions throughout the world. But weirdly most of them were not like the French revolution.  They weren’t comfortable, and many of them weren’t precisely sane (I’m not actually sure, I’m sorry, that anything that ever happens in Portugal or Spain is sane for instance. And I wouldn’t put Greece, Italy or Ireland very far behind on that.) But they were not the horror show insanity the French revolution became.  Now that could be because of French culture, but I’d say Nah, bra. While crazy France is not an exception in Europe. See above. And I’m sure I’d throw other countries in, if I knew more about them.

And yet, the insanity of communism, not that much different, propagated. To wit, it propagated the minute the USSR came into being after WWII. Before that it was a cult of intellectuals and madmen.

In fact, right after the fall of the USSR there were — briefly — glimpses that the whole Communism International Inc was falling apart.

Those disappeared when Putin got power.  He probably still had his intelligence contacts, but more importantly, he’s a Russian nationalist. His take over meant the old firm was back in business.  As I said, behind the smoke and mirrors, the USSR was Russia, and their “internationalism” was Russian nationalism and supremacy.

And as much trouble as Russia is in, they still have money, and more importantly they still have the machinery of foreign contacts, of people they hold kompromat on in various universities and governments (same as it ever was) and yes, probably international corporations and tech too.

So, why is the world rising now, and rising in a distinctly non-communist way?

Oil.

No, seriously, oil. Despite Obama’s heroic efforts with preventing fracking, the US has become a major oil producer. And oil prices can no longer support Russia’s need for $$$ to foment communist (because it’s useful, and because most of the useful idiots abroad buy this shit) insurrection and (ultimate) Russian power.

Hence why they’re working so hard to overturn the US and make us “Democratic Socialist” aka communist, because that’s what they called themselves in the 70s. Because strip mining the US would give Russia and the communist machine the ability to subjugate the rest of the world. Look how wealthy we are! (I think they’re wrong, btw. We’d not only crash so hard that we’d be net drains, but the insurrection would be a net loss.  But they don’t know that.)

Meanwhile they’re doing what they can by bleeding corporations and millionaires.  Some, maybe, because they’re true believers (and dumbasses) and some because… well… the Russians always had dirt on people. That’s how they got all the aristocratic British spies.

But it’s not enough. And people, real people who haven’t grown up so privileged that they implicitly believe bullshit to make themselves sound “smart” aren’t buying this.

Even the clown car of Dem candidates has to stop and ask Elizabeth Warren “What do you mean Medicare for all? Show us the money.”

Now, it doesn’t mean the dems won’t win and bring the glories of communism here. They have for over a century fine tuned their fraud machine, and motor voter made it impossible, in fact, for us to “true the vote,” even before vote by fraud mail and the “convenience” of voting early (so the left knows how many votes they need to manufacture.) Each of our votes is maybe 1/10th what it should be weighed down by massive amounts of dead and non existent people voting.

And yep, they still lose, at least now and then.

Think about it. They control government, education, news, entertainment (at least the traditional venues.) They propagated their narrative everywhere from the courts to your local newspaper.

And they’re still losing…

Because honestly communism is such a load of fecal matter only those who REALLY want to believe can believe it.

Hark, can you hear the people rising?  And they’re not communist at all.

Whether we stand or fall (and I haven’t given up hope, yet) in ten years it will all be different. If the propaganda and fake insurrection machine manages to take over the US, it might be the final poison pill that kills them.

They ain’t seen nothing like us yet.

In the end we win, they lose. Because reality persists, past all the propaganda.

Be not afraid. Stay chill. Prepare and build. And be ready to rebuild when the smoke lifts and the mirrors are all broken.

 

 

 

322 responses to “Something’s Happening Here

  1. Which is partly — in the US — traceable to the net and the existence of a complete, parallel system of information.

    It is a old old tradition in the US to never exactly trust government. You might even say it is part of our raison d’être. 😉

    • That’s right. Here’s a short excerpt from a story I’m writing:
      ———————————
      “You don’t trust the government, do you?”

      He gave her a slightly demented grin. “Of course not! I’m an American!”

      She gave him the you’re-not-making-sense look again.

      His grin faded. “This nation was founded more than two hundred years ago by people who distrusted the power of governments, because they had experienced too many abuses of that power,” he expounded. “They knew that government is necessary, that it must have some power to perform its essential functions, but they did their best to limit the power of their government to only that necessary minimum, and to prevent any one person, or group, from gaining too much of that power.”

      “Over the last hundred years, that government has grown completely out of control. If the founders could see how powerful, bloated and downright intrusive it has become, they would weep. And, the safeguards they put in place to prevent abuse of that power are being broken down.”
      ———————————
      You can’t have the government take away the freedom of only the people you don’t like.

    • yay. I’m glad to see you! 🙂
      And absolutely right. If our kids drag us back East I plan to make a pilgrimage of Revolutionary War historical sites.

    • Which is partly — in the US — traceable to the net and the existence of a complete, parallel system of information.
      It is a old old tradition in the US to never exactly trust government.

      Perhaps, but did it amount to much?
      Like with McCarthy and his team. They were swept by the official press.
      And now, “Big Tech” almost has the stranglehold. Goolag bosses have meetings on how to “prevent Trump situation” in 2020, kookstarter protects poor little “marginalized group” MS-13, Facehug censors mentions of “Ciaramella”… Yet at the same time Trump uses openly hostile to him Twitter to damage the whole thing more than any single man did in a generation.

      • Did it amount to much?

        You mean, other than driving out the British King’s agents?

        • Back then, chat in pubs was the primary system of news propagation almost anywhere.

          • Until the telegraph, papers generally got their news from the next town over, or farther off, by subscribing to out of town newspapers.

            • Yes. They were new and not yet integrated into power equilibrium. Anarchic.
              And now ‘net moves from this position to being subsumed and becoming yet another commodity of power. Trump used that closing window of opportunity almost at the last moment.
              But if so, “parallel” network that belong to the opposition did not exist, whether before or after the ‘net. Just the anarchic areas in which the dominant powers did not establish control yet. Then the patrols and checkpoints come, networks evaporate. «Show me what’s in your bag, is that samizdat of Emmanuel Goldstein?»

          • That, and a little Common Sense.

      • Well, other than every single bleepin’ situation where it HAS helped– such as, yes, making folks aware of the commies, Trump existing, Clinton not getting anywhere near the power he wanted, (Fill in the blank) not getting the power he wanted—

        Short of “the enemy gets a vote” bein eliminated, yes, it made a difference.

        I am seriously tired of the thing where “did it make a difference?” is conflated with “did we get absolute, unopposed victory in alignment with my theories and/or ideals.”

        Seriously, if you can’t figure out how it could’ve gone WORSE, you need to expand your imagination! Go ahead, give examples here, there’s enough history geeks that I’m SURE they can tell you how it would be worse.

        (note, some of them might not be compatible with food.)

        • Did the “old tradition” help any without ‘net? It already didn’t help McCarthy & Co, for one — they already hd power to start a fight, but then mainstream ate them. Horse- and pub- based networks didn’t counter this.

      • Yes, it mattered. “Mattering” does not mean we win every battle. “Mattering” does not mean that there aren’t dark days to come.

        Consider, I sat and watched Walter Cronkite lie through his teeth on national television about events in Southeast Asia. And yet he was “the most trusted man in America” because except for individuals who had personal knowledge (or who were closely connected to someone who had personal knowledge) there was nothing to contradict him. The current level of distrust for the major media simply could not have happened then, even though it was entirely warranted.

        So, yes, it amounts to much. It amounts to a whole lot of much.

        Which doesn’t mean that there won’t be troubled times ahead because a lot of people are still willing to be led by the nose. But without it, we might well have already lost.

        • Does it matter whether you brush your teeth? You’ll only have to do it again next time you eat. Does it matter whether you wash your dishes, mow your lawn, wash your car, paint your house?*

          As T. S. Eliot observed:
          “If we take the widest and wisest view of a Cause, there is no such thing as a Lost Cause, because there is no such thing as a Gained Cause. We fight for lost causes because we know that our defeat and dismay may be the preface to our successors’ victory, though that victory itself will be temporary; we fight rather to keep something alive than in the expectation that it will triumph.”

          *O’d ask whether it matters if you wire your arse, but too many people can’t find theirs with both hands and a map.

          • Er, is that “wire” as in telegraph, or “wire” as in electrify, or “wire” in some other sense. 🙂

            • Wire as in typo. ‘Tis what comes of being an imperfect touch-typist working from a keyboard on which forty percent of letters are worn away. I err when I watch what I do, I err when don’t watch. To err is typing.

        • Consider, I sat and watched Walter Cronkite lie through his teeth on national television about events in Southeast Asia. And yet he was “the most trusted man in America” because except for individuals who had personal knowledge (or who were closely connected to someone who had personal knowledge) there was nothing to contradict him. The current level of distrust for the major media simply could not have happened then, even though it was entirely warranted.
          So, yes, it amounts to much.

          If it amounts to much, then perhaps teh “parallel system of information” brought him down? Or did he remain “the most trusted man in America” after that?
          Don’t both “the current level of distrust for the major media simply could not have happened then” and failure of anyone “who had personal knowledge” to share it mean that you were reduced to little more than preaching to the choir?
          And if the sum total of influence available before ‘net was infinitesimal, how much was contributed to it by “tradition of distrust” and hypothetical parallel network put together?..

          • Blink? What? I can’t possibly be that sleepy.
            The word salad you just spewed either shows an inability to understand TIME in narration, or you have other psychological problems.
            Your concern trolling is appreciated. Return to sender.

          • Walter Cronkite (May he freeze in the coldest corner’s of Niflhel.) retired in 1981. In 1981 those “parallel sources of information” we are talking about here did. not. yet. exist. He was, thus, safe from being outed unlike, say, Dan Rather who tried to use his position as a respected “Newsman” to put forward the fraudulent “documentation” of Bush’s supposed misconduct as an Air Guard pilot–it was exactly those “parallel sources of information”, still in their childhood as such things go, that outed the truth of the forged documents. Or what’s his face and “I was there.” Or Hillary’s deplaning “under sniper fire.” Or any of a number of media narratives that have been taken down because people were able to get sources not filtered through traditional media outlets.

            That was the point. Cronkite could get away with it because those “parallel sources of information” did not exist in his day. It’s harder, much harder, today. Oh, they try and people who want to believe for various reasons (largely because it fits their ideology) will continue to believe. But there is an alternative for the rest of us and we’re able to learn that we’re not alone–that there are a lot more of us out here than the media would ever have admitted to back in Cronkite’s day.

            • That: us knowing we’re not alone is the genie they can’t put back in the bottle.

              • Exactly — just as happened in the Eastern Bloc once the people stopped being afraid of declaring the Commissars were buck nekkid.

                “Oh! You noticed it too?” is the initiating phrase of every revolution.

            • “History is written by the victors. History is full of Liars.”

              Unfortunately their victory was not as complete as they assumed.

            • Even then, my uncles thought the news folks were idiots, possibly malicious.

              It was one of the few things that the crazy one-eyed uncle DID NOT argue with everyone about– way back in the 80s the only one who really believed the news was totally honest was my grandma, and she figured they just made “mistakes” a lot.

          • I graduated HS in 1973, and was alive and well and aware during the 1968 Tet offensive, reported by all 3 major networks and Walter Cronkite as a great defeat for both Vietnam and American forces. But even back then I was totally aware that the real story was almost total destruction of NVA forces in South Vietnam. I was also fully aware that despite constant media reports that the war was a civil war within South Vietnam supported solely by native South Vietnamese that the war was primarily being fought by NVA regulars infiltrated into South Vietnam.

            The truth was there. The truth was available. But the Big Three broadcast propaganda of the other side. There were US newspapers that reported the truth. Drowned out by selective television coverage. Visual moving media is more riveting to the average person than print.

            The internet has “robbed” the media of their control of visual media.

      • And now, “Big Tech” almost has the stranglehold.

        Nevertheless we persist in posting …

        As strange as it might seem, your comment on one group attempting to address what they perceive as a problem in government, is, well, right there in the old American tradition of distrusting the government. It is done from all sorts of perspectives — not just the ones with which we might agree.

        • Indeed. It shows both how much beyond control ‘net is grown (hence demand for AI), and how clumsy, weak and slippery most hands maintaining stranglehold are. Still, even on wordpress, heartiste is gone, deconstructingleftism is gone…

          • And yet AccordingToHoyt is still here. Instapundit is still there. Monster Hunter Nation is still there. PJMedia is still there. And if I may say so, TheWriterInBlack is still there.

            The fact that some battles have been lost does not mean that the war is lost or even close to over. The Civil War wasn’t over after First Bull Run. The American Revolution was not over after Bunker Hill. And the Punic Wars were not over after Cannae.

            The Internet treats censorship as damage and routes around it. An oversimplification, perhaps, but with a lot of truth to it. It requires control of every possible path between source and recipient to block communication. And paths go up exponentially with nodes so good luck with that.

    • It is a old old tradition in the US to never exactly trust government.

      Americans trust government the same way* we trust fire.

      Which suggests what is happening in California is a metaphor unanticipated.

      *It is not for efficiency that the Constitution divides governmental power into three blocs with checks and balances against each other. Unfortunately, growth of the Administrative State has eroded the firewalls.

      • Or may it be that it’s the other way around: what you distrust is “government” that reigns, and what you trust is “simply a large number of responsible people doing responsible things“? This one surprised me.

        Checks and balances would be nice, if they could actually can check and balance, without influencing each other’s cadre policies, and/or having power treated as a commodity. In which cases the supposedly balancing branches are linked in positive feedback loops. Which of course is an unstable equilibrium.
        From the existence of positive feedback and inertia it follows that:
        1. No matter how you divide the subsystems at the start, the system will converge toward an extreme state. In this case, a monolithic oligarchy controlling all of the subsystems.
        2. Checks and balances (at least in the stable extreme state) in short term can suppress anomalies (i.e. President/Speaker/Judge gone mad/blackmailed/whatever), but since in long term they do the opposite, you either have sovereign power in the design, or you will have a sovereign power outside the design.

  2. Christopher M. Chupik

    “pussy hated”

    I assume “hatted”, but this also works. 😀

  3. #WorldCivilWar1

    I coined the term (so far as I know) a month or two back when I saw and felt the same thing.

    • Indeed. And “civil war” implies not just similarity, but common structure, doesn’t it?
      Then again, those are not directly connected. Yet both their sympathizers and enemies recognize them as parts of one process. While woke press blaming #Gamergate for Trump is ridiculous… they are not unrelated either. So perhaps we need some umbrella for the whole thing.
      Taleb said «I think you have to draw the conclusion that there is a global riot against pseudo-experts.»
      Or perhaps a rebellion against the mandarinate, if you prefer to point at the structure rather than characteristic phenomenon.

  4. Now, it’s possible it’s just a lag-time. Europe usually lags ten to twenty years behind the US, even when the same tech is available, possibly because we culturally (maybe genetically, but there’s no proof of that) have a tendency to be innovators who jump on things first.

    We are descended from the people who got up and left Europe. The ambitious and adventurous ones, with the gumption to leave behind everything they knew and try for something better.

    Europe remained full of the stodgy stay-at-homes, the ones timid enough to suffer in familiar misery rather than ditch ‘the old country’.

    So, yeah, it could easily be genetic.

    Unfortunately, we’re growing our own stagnant ‘wuss class’ here, and there’s no place left to go to escape them. We need a new frontier, and a way to get there that depends neither on Big Government nor Big Corporate. We first need a better way to reach orbit than single-use guided missiles.
    ———————————
    Simon Illyan: “Do you know all those old folk tales where the Count tries to get rid of his only daughter’s unsuitable suitor by giving him three impossible tasks?”
    Ekaterin Vorsoisson: “Yes…”
    Simon: “Don’t ever try that with Miles. Just….don’t.”

    • Now you’re playing Jeff Greason’s song! (And mine too, frankly.)

    • We are descended from the people who got up and left Europe.

      And those who were kicked out. It’s not just Australia.
      Same idea though.

      • *Raises paw.* Kicked out of Scotland, northern Ireland (the Ulster Plantations), the Franco-German borderlands, Virginia, Tennessee . . .

        • Exactly. When the East became “too Europe-ie” the restless feet beat further into the tameless west, until we could go west no more.

          Even now people beat to no-where-villes, skipped over, (otherwise known as flyover country), where it is still possible to etch out an off the grid homestead, or even just live off the grid. Even the reservations are getting on board … oh, they’ll still take the Federal money, but they cut the strings attached, or marginalized the strings at worse.

          Two new frontiers opening.

          Sea, if not under, on top, with technology coming into play to allow individuals or families to do so, or over the horizon. Hey, if it is feasible to convert water for those living on land, or what it takes to hydro farm a desert, why not those living on a homestead dessert platform on the sea?

          Space. Sure, for now it is equivalent to governmental sponsored exploratory ships via the Conquistadors or James Town. But how long before a Mayflower or other private enterprise or corporation? Then it spirals into family or small business enterprises (thinking Norton’s Trader’s series or even the Families in Heilein’s Citizen of the Galaxy). Maybe I won’t see it, but my imaginary grandchildren or great-grands might …

          • “Sea, if not under, on top, with technology coming into play to allow individuals or families to do so, or over the horizon. Hey, if it is feasible to convert water for those living on land, or what it takes to hydro farm a desert, why not those living on a homestead dessert platform on the sea?”

            d, the problem with sea steading as a path to freedom was pointed out way back in the early days of digital piracy wars. It was suggested that digital content would be spread simply by moving the servers hosting it to smaller island nations or even sea steadings outside territorial waters. A journoshill for the MPAA pointed out that solving that problem is why governments had attack subs and cruise missiles…. and they’d be happy to lend them to take care of the problem.

            One of the best protections for rebels today is to lair in heavily populated areas where the collateral damage can become too high for the government to pay. Does anyone think the Hong Kong students would have lasted this long if their campuses were out in the middle of nowhere? Similarly, the first gale would see the sea steading “break loose from its’ moorings and sink. No survivors.”

            • Which is one of the reasons I prefer cities. I’ve seen this movie before.

            • BTW that’s also when I tell you guys “not yet” or “this won’t work, that might” I can’t always EXPLAIN why, but I went through this before I was old enough to articulate and what’s written about that time is not always … Okay, it’s not truthful at all.
              BUT I have an internal sense of what plays will work and what won’t. Granted, sometimes wrong.
              It’s like last week, in a city we were visiting I told Dan “This walmart and neighborhood are dangerous” from going to school in a LARGE city. And he was like “looks fine.” Afterwards we found out we were in gang territory. I couldn’t TELL YOU WHY. I just know.
              Same thing when you guys panic me with ideas that I can feel in my gut will backfire badly.
              Veritas-ing the poling stations? Not a bad idea, but I don’t think ENOUGH. And I think the downside of federal prison while accomplishing nothing is really high.
              I wish someone with more experience and MORE LEGAL COUNSEL would look into it.
              But it strikes me as “possibly useful. Approach cautiously, though.”

              • Oh, Veritas already did the polling places in 2016; they’re one reason the Gov and AG of TX have been on the warpath about voter fraud (and have made some progress. Enough??) since.

                No, I was thinking Canadian hospitals. Nothing like showing the actual conditions under “Medicare for all”.

                • Oh, that? YES. Damn yes.
                  I do hope that our president has enough awareness to prepare for MASSIVE fraud. It worries the crap out of me.

                  • The problem is that the President can send the DoJ Civil Rights and Voting divisions….. who are thoroughly Deep State. Obama hit them FIRST.

                    And you saw what happened when he tried a Voting Commission without giving them the status of Federal LEOs.

                    Now, if he could deputize say Judicial Watch and TrueTheVote……

                    • One of the problems with the voting commission was that the polls, counting and ballots are state issues, and some of the states have laws specifically against sharing that data to anyone outside of a couple of specific reasons. Now, the states could easily, and should, look into their voting issues. Whether they will or not is another thing. And if they do, the results reported may or may not mesh with reality according to who is doing the looking.

                    • If that were so, the Voting Rights Act couldn’t have passed.

                      What Trump SHOULD have done is invoked the VRA and then used the Supremacy Clause to move it to the Federal level….. but he didn’t have a firm enough SCOTUS.

                    • > state issues

                      …and in some states, they’re *county* issues.

                      “Election reform” isn’t something the Fed can impose from above. Overthrowing the duly elected polities and treating them like banana republics might sound just fine to some people, but I don’t think they have enough Feds and military to make that stick.

                    • Kamas has it right. NH is one of those states that it takes an act of Congress and the Supremes to break loose our polling data.

              • This might be an artist thing; Elf can tell you if a place is Gang or not based on the graffiti, and it’s not just “hey I recognize that sign” type stuff, because folks copy gang sign all the time.

                It seems to be some kind of connection between knowing gang sign, knowing “damn this looks cool,” and recognizing when cool is sacrificed to symbols.

                …which, I just realized, would kinda be in your area.

                • Well, there’s also “Oh, crap, I’m being watched in a certain way.” Or “Oh, crap, people are behaving in a certain way.” You don’t necessarily have to know what you know, you just have to act casual and boogie out of there.

              • Veritas-ing the poling stations? Not a bad idea, but I don’t think ENOUGH

                That ain’t where the fraud is being perpetrated. Sure, there’s some fraud to be found there, but it’s all penny-ante stuff. It’s like busting street-walkers while ignoring bordellos.* Why do you think they’ve gone to fraud vote by mail in so many states?

                *Okay – I acknowledge there are reasons for keeping that traffic off the streets other than to fight prostitution, but that’s the best metaphor that occurred this side of street dope dealers vs opium dens.

        • My absolutely best friends (including our hostess) are people who aren’t descended from folk who got up and left Europe (or other largely culturally European areas). They’re people who themselves left Europe or culturally European societies.

        • Yep, part of Clan Phantom absconded from Glasgow in dead of night ahead of the debt collectors. Other parts left the Highlands when the Clearances made an Atlantic ship voyage with the howling wilderness of Canada at the far end look like a pretty good deal.

          Making me the descendant of the people who left Scotland because it sucked so bad they couldn’t stay.

          Now we have ANOTHER brand new wave of European suckage that is going to be so bad that people will be starving to death in the streets. All it would take is ONE bad harvest and a socialist government. The socialist government is already in place, and the farmers are already demonstrating against them. Its a very short step from here to taking up arms.

          One more cold, wet spring, one more early winter, and Europe is looking at a grain shortfall. Europe is also looking at that African swine fever that is currently killing pretty much all the pigs in Asia.

          https://thepigsite.com/news/2019/11/african-swine-fever-gets-closer-to-the-german-border

          Because in Europe, a pig can -walk- from China to Germany, and they do.

          On another note, I bought a book today called “How the Scots Invented The Modern World” by Arthur Herman. I saw it on the shelf and decided it must be mine.

          But the title, while awesome, brings a question. The fact that the Scots invented every goddamn thing is a matter of record. I think a good question that needs answered is: WHY did they do that? I think, given what I know of Scots history, the answer may be “because they had to.” Necessity is the mother of invention, and trying to wring a living from the inhospitable North American woods or crappy barren old Scotland brought a bunch of necessity their way.

          • The fact that the Scots invented every goddamn thing is a matter of record. …WHY did they do that?

            Not everything. People like Ike Newton, Bob Boyle, Tony van Leeuwenhoek and others discovered many basic scientific principles. The Scots possessed a highly practical bent which contributed to them becoming the world’s engineers, implementing those principles.

            • Right The Scots have some excellent theoreticians. But in the main what they have are devoted experimentalists/engineers. Hell the Greeks knew steam expanded massively via Hero’s engine and could clearly make some amazing mechanical stuff (C.F. the Antikythera mechanism), but no one ever tried to stick things together (and perhaps couldn’t due to needed decent iron or mild steel for some of the parts although period bronze is much better than we think) for even a one lung steam engine. There’s just something about that culture (sheer stubborness perhaps) that put the Scots at the forefront of things for most of the 18th and 19th centuries.

        • Not exactly “kicked out” – but a majority just barely ahead of the King’s retainers, the Sheriff, an outraged husband or three…

          • It is possible that there might have been a certain amount of dispute over sudden acquisition of livestock ownership, or over expressions of principled disagreement with the current government. Or both, because that helps finance one’s sudden departure to horizons new.

          • Yes, one ancestor was outraged, OUTRAGED, I say, at the accusations that he was stealing and selling the grain meant for the country squire’s animals. He sent his family off to America, sold the rest of the grain, and beat feet to the next boat. At least, he never went into government.

            Another decided he’d rather not be a farmer and soldier for the king of [tiny country too close to much bigger, hostile neighbor] and boogied to the New World before things went sideways. He was happy to be working in an ammunition factory (cooking TNT, actually), rather then being on the other end of the product cycle…

    • The German-Russians were Germans who left the Germanic states for promise of a better life in Russia. Then, when that started looking dodgy, they picked up stakes again and headed for the new world. Some settled in South America, some in North America. Some headed for Chicago initially, then headed farther west. My family in particular landed in North Dakota. But quite a few of my great grandparents relatives weren’t content there, so continued heading all over the place.

      Americans aren’t quite gypsies or nomads, but probably only one step down from that. Things aren’t quite what you want in the area you are in? Pack up and head for someplace else.

      • “Americans aren’t quite gypsies or nomads, but probably only one step down from that. Things aren’t quite what you want in the area you are in? Pack up and head for someplace else.”

        And don’t look back.

      • Americans aren’t quite gypsies or nomads

        I caught a portion of a Rick Perry interview while setting down to watch a DVD. Interviewer asked Perry about a sign spotted in his office, quoting Davy Crockett’s statement to consituents after his reelection bid was defeated: “You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas.”

        • Strike “consituents”, insert constituents

          I gotta get a new keyboard. Or maybe new fingers — the middle ones are wearing out.

    • Unfortunately, we’re growing our own stagnant ‘wuss class’ here, and there’s no place left to go to escape them.

      So did the Mongols. Right until the next generation grew up really, really fed up with crap they have to take… then one poor guy named Temujin and his sworn brother started a civil war across the entire area of Central Eurasian steppes. You may have heard about how this one went. =)

      We need a new frontier, and a way to get there that depends neither on Big Government nor Big Corporate.

      Like rock banging? (NSFW)

      • All Temujin wanted was to get his wife back, and things just kind of snowballed…
        (that’s in really broad strokes)

      • Danny Hamilton

        The one thing people forget is of the great conquerors only Temujin was successful! One of his sons succeeded him and grew the empire even larger. It only started falling off when his grandson Kublai ruled and he was more Chinese then Mongol. The Chinese won by absorbing the Mongols.

        • The Chinese have a talent for absorbing all comers, eventually

          • It’s not hard when the Chinese outnumbered the Mongols as much as they did.

            Also, the Chinese bureaucracy is the model that I think about when considering our own modern Federal Deep State. Rulers come and go, but the bureaucracy remains. A bureaucracy that remains is going to be able to impose its own rules on its putative rulers. And why does the bureaucracy remain? Because pushing papers isn’t glamorous. But someone’s got to do it, or the whole governmental edifice will grind to a screeching halt. And no matter how much you dislike government, there are good arguments for it in at least a minimal form.

            • Looping back to Weber and the Honorverse, the Solarian League’s Permanent Senior Undersecretaries and bureaucracy are pretty much the literary definition of the Deep State.

    • I am dancing as fast as I can….

    • Europe remained full of the stodgy stay-at-homes, the ones timid enough to suffer in familiar misery rather than ditch ‘the old country’.

      In fairness, they had plenty remain who had figured ways to work the system and feather their nests perfectly well. Do not ignore the Industrial Revolution had its foundation in Europe (well, Britain, largely, but that’s sorta Europe.)

      Two Three major continental wars did a fair bit to weed out the ones with guts, largely by spreading those guts across the landscape.

    • :We are descended from the people who got up and left Europe.

      Mine got kicked out of two other countries first for being cantankerous I’m not sure which was stronger, that or the adventurous. Don’t ask my wife, she’s biased 🙂

    • You put a positive spin on this, but I’ve often seen it put as that we Americans are descended from generations of people who, when the going got tough… ran far away. First across the Atlantic, then “out West.” And then abandoned the economically-valuable hearts of our cities — the “inner city” — for the suburbs* rather than stay and fight the crime problem driving the so-called “white flight.” That our first response to conflict is never to stand and fight, but “head for the hills” and flee to the frontier… only there is no more frontier, nowhere left to run anymore.

      And as for standing and fighting, the “Age of the Gun” — when any average man with a civilian-affordable weapon can become an effective warfighter with just a little drill — is well over, and on the ebb-and-flow of quantity-versus-quality, expensively-equipped-warrior-elite versus mass-citizen-army, we’re back towards the conditions of the German Peasants’ War.

      *My civil engineer friend has a rather lengthy rant about the multifarious terribleness of suburbs, from perspectives of land use efficiency, resource consumption, sustainability (more in the “not being a money sink long-term” sense than the greenie-weenie sense, but that also), transportation and commuting to employment, community formation vs. social atomization, and so on, and why we never should have allowed places like Detroit to decay like they did.

      • > And as for standing and fighting, the “Age of the Gun” — when any average man with a civilian-affordable weapon can become an effective warfighter with just a little drill — is well over,

        How’s that working out in Afghanistan?

      • BobtheRegisterredFool

        Civil Engineers are possibly equipped for Civil Engineering; human societies are complex beyond analysis with merely the tools well tested in soils, structures, and hydrology.

        Engineers absolutely are not immune to being insane cranks on the topic of this or that social issue. People who say ‘an engineer said so’ as support for a claim are sometimes nincompoops with really poor judgement in engineers.

        Your claim about weapons systems likewise fails to impress me.

      • And as for standing and fighting, the “Age of the Gun” — when any average man with a civilian-affordable weapon can become an effective warfighter with just a little drill — is well over, and on the ebb-and-flow of quantity-versus-quality, expensively-equipped-warrior-elite versus mass-citizen-army, we’re back towards the conditions of the German Peasants’ War.

        Yeah, about that.

        https://thewriterinblack.com/2018/03/02/you-cant-fight-the-military-with-rifles/

        All this high tech death that the military has to hand is of limited use in a domestic insurgency. People have this strange idea that “Civil War II” will see replays of Anteitam and Gettysburg only with the US army with all its tanks, artillery and air support on one side and a bunch of hicks with hunting rifles on the other. Think instead Beirut and Northern Ireland only cranked up at least three orders of magnitude.

        • All this high tech death that the military has to hand is of limited use in a domestic insurgency.

          I think you are overlooking the recent demonstration of our military’s effectiveness in subduing the ragtag bunch of Afghan jihadis. Surely they will be even more effective applying such techniques amongst their family, friends, neighbors, and countryfolk in the American populace.

          • And folks, sorry to lose my patience, but the idea of immigration as cowardice even when you do it as I did in the relative comfort and relative safety of the 20th century is possibly one of the most stupid things I ever heard. MIGHT be the most stupid after “from which according to his ability, to which according to his need”.
            Yeah. Casting your connections, family, culture and education to the four winds to start over again with your 20lbs allotted luggage and a child’s understanding of what’s going on which will take years to remedy (if ever) IS indeed the coward’s way out. Sarcasm off. PFUI.

          • However, the Left will happily endorse Rules of Engagement against other Americans that they will call a war crime if used against foreign enemies.

            • BobtheRegisterredFool

              Two problems.

              One, the fancy weapons systems are not magic. Takes a lot of work to get them working in one set of circumstances. Infantry hasn’t been replaced yet, and it would take effort and organization to get all the pieces put together for having the systems reach anywhere near their maximum potential in a civil war. You’d need to reorganize, you’d need lead time, you’d need supportive leadership willing to trust their subordinates with the tech. You’d probably also need a lot of defense spending. Bush didn’t have the will, Obama had other interests, and Trump is quite busy. Even if such a shift in programs had been made, you think recent fed bureaucracies could keep something like that a secret?

              Second problem is with the infantry. Sure, let’s grant that Obama corrupted the officer corps, and so forth. He didn’t think in terms of NCOs. Even if the ‘pacifists’ had not been blocking things, the NCOs are a serious problem when it comes to, say, ‘send the army south, burning and killing’. If the institutional culture has changed sufficiently rapidly as to make atrocity easy, it has also changed enough that we can’t trust it to deliver victory in combat.

              The pacifists and the NCOs are not the critical limiting factor when it comes to lasting peace with our foreign adversaries. That lack is the resolve of the American people to finish the matter. With that resolve, the pacifists would be of no impact. Without popular resolve, the enthusiastic support of the left would not suffice to truly finish a foreign adversary. Why would domestic targets require any less resolve to translate intent all the way into filling in the mass graves?

              • Both of which points I acknowledge. But that willingness is one reason this war will be a) nastier and b) longer than most.

                As Col Schlicter has pointed out, the Left hates us and wants us dead. As I’ve pointed out, you aren’t going to be able to live in the same country with them even after they pretend to give up.

                • BobtheRegisterredFool

                  There are some underlying factors that I’m pretty sure are not humanly knowable. The combination of those which lead to what you predict is possible, given what little I know.

                  I am personally rather dysfunctional. In order to pull things together as well as I’ve been able to, I had to bet on the more pleasant possibilities in the uncertainties.

                • Steve, but do they have the guts to fight?
                  Note Antifa does not gambol where opposed. You’re WAY overestimating both the competence, the courage and the ability of the enemy. I will grant you that’s better than underestimating them. But it’s not idea.

      • Americans are descended from generations of people who, when the going got tough… ran far away. First across the Atlantic, then ‘out West.’

        Yes, the Comanche, Sioux and Apache (to cite a few) were so welcoming and hospitable.

        Mostly what Americans have fled is corrupt government, such as the Tammany, Fitzgerald, Pendergast, &, Daley machines; if that’s how others want to be ruled that’s okay, but we prefer to rule ourselves.

      • RAN AWAY?
        This could only be said by someone who a) wasn’t an European.
        B) didn’t immigrate.
        AKA — are you out of your bloody mind? Immigrating and acculturating takes more fortitude and courage than you can possibly imagine.
        As for standing and fighting… WHAT WORLD ARE YOU FROM, PRECISELY?
        Because let’s talk, okay? Afghanistan was the “graveyard of empires” with completely HOMEMADE weapons. Insurgency is not ranked armies in formation.
        As for what Detroit became, etc…. Yeah. Let’s talk about EUROPE, shall we? Oh, please. Grow up. And stop being provincial. Also learn history.
        No, I no longer have any patience.

        • You said it better than me. Two middle fingers up in support.

          (Seems noteworthy to get lectured by someone new to the conversation. Is ATH now the recipient of the GS Rent-a-troll operation?)

          • I didn’t approve the comment, so my guess is he commented here before.
            From someone attempting to lecture me on FB on how the US was “Just a European country” (no, seriously) culturally, my guess is we’ve been linked to one of the idiot blogs.

            • BobtheRegisterredFool

              Yeah, I think something is up. Had a different nut show up at TXRed’s blog recently.

              Possibly it is just idiot school kids, or coincidence. Feels like some of the previous times when things have been exciting from the outside. Like when the puppy kickers decide it is another year to pay attention to the Sad Puppies question.

              I think I really, really, really need to quit following politics this year.

              I may simply be stupid.

              • There’s a regular leftie on Victory Girls now. If there’s an opportunity to slam POTUS, you can count on the guy. He’s worse at wall-o-text than I am, so I’m not sure too many people are reading his stuff.

                • It’s possible Moscow’s troll factories are ramping up. They went crazy in 2016 and disappeared after the election. And you could trace them ALL to foreign IPs. Weirdly, their main thrust seemed to be to “support” Trump while making him sound racist and anti-semitic. It ALMOST worked on me, and I think it worked on a lot of the never Trumpers who remain never Trumpers.

                  • BobtheRegisterredFool

                    Technically, I never formally joined Never Trump, but…

                    In my case, I’m struggling with a weird issue of personal orientation; voting Trump is the best way to hurt the Democrats, but I see spiritual peril if I rush my judgements. By just about any standard, I am badly educated in theology, and my personal convictions were originally based in Protestant teachings on Revelation. Being a stubborn ass is the true objective, winning is simply something that Christians experience at times when it serves God’s purposes for their attempts to serve him to bear that fruit. Yes, sometimes we serve Him by expedient means, but sometimes He calls on us to be martyrs. My judgement of what He wants is of course very very very questionable.

                    This is my personal sense of religion, I make no warranties about anyone else’s. I seriously dislike a situation where my answers to a political question are entangled with a religious question I have no answer for.

                    • Which group is killing babies? From a moral or religious point of view, this makes it obvious to me which side I want to be on.

                    • I am inclined to agree, but I have to bear in mind that a number of people who are not stupid in every area of life have swallowed the idea that unborn babies aren’t really babies and seem convinced the US and Israel are the only countries responsible for civilian deaths in war.

                    • I haven’t cared for Trump since the early 80s when he was instrumental in killing the last viable competitor to the NFL. But, he’s been surprisingly effective as Pres and I’ll likely fill in the bubble next to his name next year.

                    • This election will not be a matter of “Is Donald Trump the best possible person to be President?”

                      This election will be a matter of “Is Donald Trump the best person on the ballot to be President?”

                      Given a choice between two evils I generally choose the lesser, and Trump has thus far been far the lesser evil. Consider the consequences of granting Hillary (or anybody currently running for the Democrat nomination) those last two Supreme Court nominations. And that is merely the most obvious benefit of electing Trump. Consider the world situation, especially the cash flows into Russia, Venezuela, and Iran, were the government still obstructing fracking.

              • I may simply be stupid.

                I get to feeling that way, too, at times. Too much makes no [EXPLETIVE] sense for me to casually discard that possibility.

                But too many years of observation have convinced me that however stupid I might be, the world is far stupider still.

                Which leads to the question: in a terribly stupid world, is it smart to be smart? In the Kingdom of the Blind, the one-eyed man is a dangerous lunatic.

            • Name’s different enough that I found it– commented on two other posts, five years ago.

              https://accordingtohoyt.com/2014/10/25/have-you-seen-the-well-to-do/#comment-212298

              Declaring GamerGate was completely lost, no hope, it’s all over.

              (Yeah…how did that go?)

            • And also about 5 years ago, declaring it was all hopeless, illegals would decide the elections and shooting back is useless:
              https://accordingtohoyt.com/2014/10/23/will-you-also-tolerate-this/#comment-212345

      • Dude. Please.

        “And then abandoned the economically-valuable hearts of our cities — the “inner city” — for the suburbs* rather than stay and fight the crime problem driving the so-called “white flight.””

        Yes. When we leave its called “white flight” and we are called Bad for doing it. When we -stay- that is called “gentrification” and we are called Bad for doing it.

        “And as for standing and fighting, the “Age of the Gun” — when any average man with a civilian-affordable weapon can become an effective warfighter with just a little drill — is well over…”

        I want to see the conscript army that’s going to fight its way across Arizona, or even Ontario Canada for that matter. Commonly available camping food and gear plus a decent rifle makes -anybody- with two brain cells to rub together 100% more effective than the average plug in any non-Western army. Add some commonly available night vision gear and pickup-trucks for extra punch. Dirt-poor Afghan hillbillies with no education drove the Soviet Union into bankruptcy.

        “Should hostilities once break out between Japan and the United States, it is not enough that we take Guam and the Philippines, nor even Hawaii and San Francisco. To make victory certain, we would have to march into Washington and dictate the terms of peace in the White House. I wonder if our politicians, among whom armchair arguments about war are being glibly bandied about in the name of state politics, have confidence as to the final outcome and are prepared to make the necessary sacrifices.” Yamamoto Isokoru, Chief of the Japanese Navy.

        Admiral Yamamoto had a pretty good grasp of the realities.

        “My civil engineer friend has a rather lengthy rant about the multifarious terribleness of suburbs…”

        Suburbs are far superior to cities for the purposes of the people who -live- in them, particularly land use and transportation. As in, the suburbanite has some land around their house that they can use to do what they want, and they have transportation that takes them from exactly where they are to exactly where they want to go, exactly when they want to go there.

        That this is inconvenient for city planners and railroad/mass transit boosters is another mark in its favor. Such people should be inconvenienced as much as possible at all times.

      • analytical-engine-mechanic

        We should probably also remember a “third category” of immigrants — neither the “come to stay” joiners of existing society, a la (see above & elsewhere) Sarah d’Almeida Hoyt, nor the “come to colonize and conquer” a la (arguably) Rashida Tlaib etc., but the “come away somewhere viable till home is livable again” quasi-refugee (but also genuine) immigrants.

        And I mean “consider” as in “consider this another group *not* motivated by some kind of cowardice and/or ‘grass is always greener over there’ syndrome, or Whatever” — whether people setting for up a few years of safer life here to stay alive in the middle of World War II, to the decades-long “influx” of what people Ireland (before its so-called “economic miracle”) could *not* support domestically, or anyone else surviving economically or politically using the U.S. as a safe haven *and contributing positively here* until they go back.

        Take a good, close look (any and all proponents of that “cowardice” theory) at what turn-of-the-century Ireland (see “The Red-Haired Girl From the Bog” by Patrician Monaghan for one family’s story, on both sides of the Atlantic) was really like. Or, and quite obscenely, Potato-Famine-era Ireland really was like. Take a good, close look at what happened in World War II to those who chose to stay, and fight either overtly or covertly, throughout most of Occupied (X) most of the time.

        Then think, specificallly and seriously, about what it takes to cross the Atlantic (at a minimum) to live and work in a new country, keep in touch with the old one through all its travails, and *then* pick your time to (having survived long enough to *reach* such a point in time) go home with all you’ve saved and all you’ve made, wade into the (quite possibly literal) rubble and ashes, and start your own little part in your old-country’s new re-telling of the Phoenix myth.

        To misquote Martin Caidin only slightly: cowardice… it ain’t.

      • My civil engineer friend has a rather lengthy rant about the multifarious terribleness of suburbs, from perspectives of land use efficiency, resource consumption, sustainability (more in the “not being a money sink long-term” sense than the greenie-weenie sense, but that also), transportation and commuting to employment, community formation vs. social atomization, and so on, and why we never should have allowed places like Detroit to decay like they did.

        Your friend is pissed at screws for not being nails. A hammer is what he has, so he’s judging stuff by how well it will work with that, but it’s a bad metric.

      • And as for standing and fighting, the “Age of the Gun” — when any average man with a civilian-affordable weapon can become an effective warfighter with just a little drill — is well over, and on the ebb-and-flow of quantity-versus-quality, expensively-equipped-warrior-elite versus mass-citizen-army, we’re back towards the conditions of the German Peasants’ War.

        There is a hotly contested document, by a US Army tactician, arguing that the entire force of the US military can maybe take out between one and five cities, if they’re the right ones.

        The argument boils down to other tacticians thinking he makes too many assumptions that favor “yes, it’s possible.”

        Also, the Army is startled to hear that you can’t turn J Random Kid into a war fighter with some basic drilling. 😀

        • Heck, we took down Fallujah, population about 250,000 — how hard could Houston, with ten times that population, be?

          Of course, the MSM was opposing our invasion of Fallujah.

          • Oh good heavens, don’t get me started on the sheer SIZE involved, too– pick something “easy” like El Paso. Base in the middle of town, up against a fortified border, limited routes in and out, but it’s over two hundred square miles for just the city proper, and oh gosh it’s hard to control.

            • The funniest thing about the left and Europe (BIRM) is that they have NO concept of the size of the US. Or the variety of it. Most leftists are East urbanites.

              • BobtheRegisterredFool

                Hilarious thing on esr’s blog Armed and Dangerous. One of the local leftwing trolls is a Euro by the handle of Winter.

                Posted some concern trolling about the possibility that Eric’s grudging support for Trump compromises Eric’s opposition to literal fascism. On the basis that picking up illegals out of the desert and putting them in a few locations for housing is a concentration camp, hence only comprehensible as a step in exterminating the folks.

                Now, Eric is libertarian, but his orientation is an easterner and an international in terms of places he understands.

                So, lots of heated debate, and I don’t think anyone pointed out that these people are getting a lot of themselves killed crossing these deserts, and leaving them out in the middle of the desert is a death sentence. Or that if we are really so close to implementing mass murder, the government needs to be housing the illegals in a few defensible locations to keep ordinary Americans from taking the job into their own hands. Because you could pick up desert survivor illegals when they are near reaching food, water, transport, and shelter, and dump them back in the middle of the desert, and potentially avoid being caught. (Lastly, the way the US federal government works, you’d see a grant to finish researching concentration camps before they ever got around to implementation. Because even if the feds wanted to just do what the Nazis did, US logistics are different, and they would need to find suppliers for an alternate gas, because the German suppliers are not available, and wouldn’t have the stuff in stock anymore.)

              • If we commence a discussion of that about which the Left and Europe (aka, the Farther left) have NO concept we’re gonna need a bigger blog.

                A fundamental problem afflicting our self-anointed* elites is they are convinced that Ipse dixit comprises a compelling argument.

                *”I am of the elite because I agree with me, you are deplorable because you disagree with me”

              • The funniest thing about the left and Europe (BIRM) is that they have NO concept of the size of the US.

                Heck, I’ve lived in the MIDDLE of several chunks of it, and I catch myself mentally rolling over areas where there’s not a lot to pay attention to– we’re a mile from the library, my mental map is “a few drive-ways, the gas station, four way stop, one more block and you’re there.”

                It’s actually at least four farms, including fields, the simi-industrial area, the “new development” businesses, the houses that use to be outside of town, the businesses that use to be on the edge of town, the gas station, the houses inside two, three blocks of down town and THEN the library.

                But in your head, it’s a quick jog.

                Don’t get me started on the “Walmart just down the road.” I CAN at least say we’re the first house after the turn when you leave the town that has it!
                (Explaining the joke: the road-map of Iowa looks like someone was playing a city sim and got really lazy with the road grid, you can go 90 miles without a turn that’s sharp enough to be visible in a lot of areas. I LOVE it!)

                • Just don’t miss it when it does turn. Got a turn here on I40 that they have all sorts of signs, lights and such on because semis forgot to turn

  5. Can you hear the people sing? They are saying “Hold my beer!”

  6. It’s probably monstrous of me, but [Kl]antifa: Lubbock sounds hilarious.

    • Why are you slandering Lubbock that way!!??

      • Because he’s been there when the college students decided to celebrate (or mourn?)

        Actually, the idea of Antifa:Lubbock is pretty amusing, because that’s the school with a cow-barn in the middle of campus, and where there’s a wait-list to take Western Civ/ Great Books (or was as of four years ago. They may have expanded that enough to make room for all those interested.)

    • [Kl]antifa:Klamath Falls would be equally amusing, at least for the locals, for a short time.

  7. People have talked about memes propagating through Societies in a sense like viruses . It seems that Socialism/Communism/Transnationalism is the meme equivalent of Marburg or Ebola . I’d say syphilis due to its extended effects, but its bacterial not viral so not quite analogous. The SCT meme enters a society and starts replicating itself within the society. It is also busily trying to transmit itself to other societies. I speak as if the SCT meme had a will but it doesn’t. Its an emergent effect like the turning of a giant flock of starlings. Just as there is no lead bird in a giant flock the SCT meme is just reacting to something else (In essence the slowing/death of its host). The meme slowly (or sometimes not so slowly) destroys its host. Venezuela is an excellent example of this, one of the healthiest economies of South America it caught the SCT meme. The memes viral particles (Chavez and Maduro among others) acted to increase the health of their descendants and used the largess to endear themselves to their people and others (Look up http://citizensenergy.com/ and see how Slow Joe Kennedy got #2 fuel oil from Citgo which was a wholly owned Venezuelan company at one point). Of course like most viruses they use the energy/health of the host slowly robbing the host of its strength. I wanted to compare to syphillis as this seems to have 3 major stages
    1) Early infection a great deal of chaos and meme strains competing for space usually with one strain coming out the winner, or with the meme defeated/evicted
    2) A period of pseudo stability. Length of this depends on the health of the host when it first contracts the meme and on the particular rapaciousness of the meme strain. It may be possible to break free of the meme in this stage although I can think of few examples (Poland, some of the other ex Warsaw Pact/ Iron Curtain states)
    3) Final stage. At this point the meme has exhausted the hosts resources. Any speck of function the host had is gone. Prognosis is extremely poor likely effective death of the host.

    As far as I can tell no part of the world is free of this infestation (other than those so dead or poor it doesn’t matter). The US seems to have an early stage 1 infestation. The PIIGs of Europe have late stage 2 to early stage 3. Venezuela is clearly stage 3 late. Some European Countries are fighting Stage 2 infestations (U.K. , maybe France). China feels like late stage 2, its trying to wipe out/subvert its immune system (Hong Kong) and trundle on down to stage 3, perhaps HIV is a better model although early HIV was brutally fast. Like HIV the SCT meme subverts/uses the defense mechanisms to further its growth.

    Looks like we need to get out there and be the T Cell/B Cell/ Macrophages and fight this mess before the SCT meme turns the US into a meme equivalent of a 3rd stage syphilitic.

    • SCT is not bacterial. It might not even be viral. Perhaps prion? It looks kinda right, to those who don’t look with care and think things over… and once in… WHOMP!

    • No one is free, but we’re fighting back. Maybe the body needed to learn to recognize it…

      • Makes sense. This particular flavor of meme nonsense is moderately new. It’s what epidemiologists call a virgin fields epidemic. Seems like some of the patients immune systems are starting to respond, so there is hope yet.

    • Socialism is a strain of “Brotherhood of Man”/”Inner Light”/etc, just like other quasi-egalitarian movements. It obviously goes along well with feminists, “anti-racists” and even PETA.
      For the memetic approach, see “How Dawkins Got Pwned” by Mencius Moldbug. The whole point of which is a demonstration that that Dawkins built the tools needed, but then managed to avert his gaze from the most obvious hypothesis that follows from his meme theory and the subject he chose to “study”.

  8. … But what it is ain’t exactly clear
    There’s a man with a gun over there
    Telling me I got to beware

    [Chorus]
    I think it’s time we stop
    Children, what’s that sound?
    Everybody look – what’s going down?

    [Verse 2]
    There’s battle lines being drawn
    Nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong


    Yeah, been here before.

    • Christopher M. Chupik

      This song was exactly what went through my head when I saw the title of the post.

    • Verse 2 is doubtful….

      • Wellllll … there was a reason I cut it off where I did …

        But I remember the late Sixties well enough to know that there is profit to be found by spreading paranoia. One thing a smokescreen does really well is hide the actual fire.

    • When I hear this song, the years of movies have me thinking of the whup whup of Huey blades, M-16 mags being loaded and the charging handles pulled (and, in the movies that are honest, condoms being pulled off the muzzles), M-60 belts being checked for kinks or bends, grenades secured, helmets on, and getting close to Indian Country.

      Just that music catches me…

  9. As to how there is rebellion against the elites in Europe without political blogs and other ornaments of the internet;

    Europe has been dealing with bossy elites for a long time. It seems likely that channels were in place long before the internet went worldwide. Not Samizdat, precisely, but analogous. Do I know what it is (they are)? No. But it would not surprise me to discover they exist.

  10. we no longer trust our governments or those so called elites.

    Oh, I trust ’em.

    ‘Bout as far as I can throw ’em.

    But we should prob’ly not discuss what I trust ’em to do. ‘Cause we all knew what they was when we agreed to carry ’em.

  11. I really hope we win before things turn “interesting” in the not interesting, cover your butt sense.

  12. Timothy E. Harris

    I don’t know of you’ve seen any of Glenn Beck’s videos on Ukraine & surrounding issues. He’s got the documents showing that the “revolution” in Ukraine that allowed Biden to become the point man setting Ukraine policy was fomented by George Soros’ Civil Society 2.0/Open Society 2.0 groups in concert with the U.S. State Department and USAID. And it’s not just Ukraine. The unrest in Chile (and several other countries) has the same origin.
    By getting into bed with Soros the State Dept has shown they are on the other side. They are overdue for a thorough housecleaning.

  13. This is a part of a corporate machine that creates revolutions.

    Dang, gal! You got yourself a story idea there. “I Was A Rabble-Rouse For Revolutions’R’Us.”

    Grant-funded community activists, outside agitators, what was ACORN if not corporate revolutionaries?

    Heck, I reckon about half the plots of the old Mission Impossible series were made-to-order revolutions.

    • Maybe. I have reports this is not right, just what the regime wants us to believe.

    • I’d trust official government information from Iran about as far as I can throw a Clydesdale.

    • The thing is, it will look like its failing badly right up until the mullahs jump on the plane with one of the pallets of Obama Cash. The scope of what’s happening is what’s new – the mullahs had the ability to fly in Hezbollah thugs to the few big cities to break up the last round, but this is happening all over the country. At some point I think the regular army will start choosing a side that their kids are on instead of the side those IRGC idiots are on, then it’ll be what’s left of the regular army against the IRGC and Hezbollah. And if they need air cover, Saudi will be happy to bomb mullahcrat positions.

      OTOH, if it stays just the kids then it will go underground, and hopefully this time we’ll start making intelligence connections like the Israelis did last time.

      Oh, and Ciaramella and Prince Andrew didn’t watch while Epstein killed himself.

  14. the only wealth coming in — and boy, were they broke — came from leeching from other countries that fell under their sway

    Soviet Union as pyramid scam?

    Or is it a Multi-Level Marketing scheme?

    “You can get rich through Marxism! Just recruit five countries and you get 5% of their wealth, and get them to each recruit five other countries …

    • You nailed it. Your bonus is a country of your choice to loot and pillage. 🙂 I can say that because I am a descendant of Vikings.

    • It’s basically what it was.

    • Great now I’m thinking about the prevalence of MLM schemes in Utah and the large number of Mormons in the State Department.

    • I vaguely remember that a while back (I think it was during Dubya’s time in the White House), similar things were being noted about the big unions here in the US. Apparently, the really big unions (like AFL-CIO and SEIU) don’t have enough money in their pension funds to pay all of the former dues paying members of their unions. So what they have to do in order to keep the pensions solvent (more or less) is to absorb other unions that still have solvent pension funds, and then transfer all of the assets and accounts into the larger union’s pension fund so that they can keep it all in the black for a little while longer.

      • Unions. Or in light of the pension busted larger single employer some smaller pensions got shafted. They were “solvent” until the new rules came into play. Husbands union was tied to a single company, so ruled single employer. They had to merge with a larger non-single employer union. As it turns out the Carpenters & Joiners. He gets two pension checks. First one based on 30 years of employment under the old rules, second one under new rules for 5 years. $1600/month first one (drops to $1000 survivor), the other $98/month, which drops to $0.

  15. “Do you hear the people sing?
    Singing the songs of angry men?
    It is the music of a people who will not be slaves again!”

    Yes, I know that in context it was the anthem for a bunch of socialist wannabe-revolutionary academics. I thought my minarchist culture could use it, so I appropriated it!

    • Thoughts beyond their thoughts to high bards are given.

    • My Lady LOVES that musical, and got me to take her to a performance i9n DC. The music is powerful. The CHARACTERS makes me want to get up on stage and shake them until their teeth rattled. To think of thew headache – not to say sturm und drang – Valjean could have avoided if instead of hiding out in Paris THE CAPITOL OF THE NATION THAT WANTS TO JAIL HIS ASS he had taken ship for the New World.

      I have no inside knowledge, but when I read the late Sir Terry’s NIGHT WATCH I got the impression that he had had something of the same reaction, and the book was the result.

      I’ve often wondered what a really good Japanese writer would make out of Javert. He’s a MUCH more interesting character than Valjean, and his conflicting obligations to the State that raised him and as a human being.

      Sadly, from what little I know about Japanese pop culture, they don’t seem to have jumped on the idea.

  16. Which is like turtles, only malevolent

    They’re The Foot?

    (…I blame my kids. They were trying to remember the name for the painter of the Mona Lisa, and remembered he was an inventor, and….well… I knew they’d get it?)

    • Note:
      when you stand for what you believe in, and find the strength to do what’s right? That’s turtle power.

      • And yes, the rest of it has similar oooh-rah in with the…well, over the top don’t mind us just a silly show why would you think anything could be noble stuff:
        https://www.elyrics.net/read/p/partners-in-kryme-lyrics/turtle-power-lyrics.html
        Now this is for real, so you fight for justice.
        Your shell is hard so you shout,
        “They can’t dust us off like some old coffee table.”
        Since you been born you been willin’ and able to defeat the sneak,
        protect the walk, fight for rights and your freedom to speak.
        Now the villian is chillin’ so you make a a stand.
        Back to the wall, put your sword in your hand.
        Remember the words of your teacher, your master;
        “Evil moves fast but good moves faster
        than light shining for your illumination.”
        Good versus evil equals confrontation.
        So when you’re in trouble don’t give in and turn sour.
        Try to rely on your Turtle Power.
        Lyrics from eLyrics.net

      • Turtle power?


        Heh – she said turtle power!

  17. Totally Off Topic:

    Today in History, November 23, 1963: ‘Doctor Who’ premiered on BBC

  18. Gotta keep our priorities in line, right?

    Butterfly on a Bomb Range: Endangered Species Act at Work on Fort Bragg
    The Associated Press | By Seth Borenstein
    FORT BRAGG, N.C. — In the unlikely setting of the world’s most populated military installation, amid all the regimented chaos, you’ll find the Endangered Species Act at work.

    There, as a 400-pound explosive resounds in the distance, a tiny St. Francis Satyr butterfly flits among the splotchy leaves, ready to lay as many as 100 eggs. At one point, this brown and frankly dull-looking butterfly could be found in only one place on Earth: Fort Bragg’s artillery range.

    Now, thanks in great measure to the 46-year-old federal act, they are found in eight more places — though all of them are on other parts of the Army base. And if all goes well, biologists will have just seeded habitat No. 10.

    One of Earth’s rarest butterfly species, there are maybe 3,000 St. Francis Satyrs. There are never going to be enough of them to get off the endangered list, but they’re not about to go extinct either. They are permanent patients of the bureaucratic conservation hospital ward.

    In some ways, the tiny butterfly is an ideal example of the more than 1,600 U.S. species that have been protected by the Endangered Species Act. Alive, but not exactly doing that well.

    To some experts, just having these creatures around means the 46-year-old law has done its job. …

    • There are a lot of artillery ranges that double as rare bird sanctuaries.

      • Don’t tell the econuts – they are already “remediating” i.e. tearing out logging roads and such to keep people from actually using the public lands. Designating umpty-three million acres across the western US as “artillery ranges” solely to keep people out is not beyond conception.

        • Because the econuts keep pushing for “wilderness” designations by the Feds under the Wilderness Act of 1964, and federal “wilderness” is by definition “an area where the earth and community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain” and “an area of undeveloped Federal land retaining its primeval character and influence, without permanent improvements or human habitation, which is protected and managed so as to preserve its natural conditions.” Personally, I think they’ve gone way overboard with it.

          • The birds apparently have adapted to artillery and take an interest, from safe spots. There was an article about it in a birdwatching magazine. (And it is great for birdwatcher life lists of birds, so the artillery ranges have special birdwatching visiting days.)

            • My daughter, the 2-hitch Marine says that the fact that Camp Pendleton is a wildlife refuge for several different species, is about the only thing keeping that prime (I say prime!) California coastal real estate out of the hands of developers. Those various species seem to be remarkably tolerant to noisy vehicles, loud explosions, gunfire, and baffled Marines going astray on their land-nav exercise in the boondocks of Camp Pendleton.

  19. It’s Soros all the way down. Which is like turtles, only

    Soros has a finger in every ugly pie, but “all the way down”? He’s mostly the cashier #1. Even money-wise, there are the rest of the “Good and Great”. For caravans, he needed as a partner Mastercard. Google is larger. And then, there are Foundations.
    Power-wise? Soros doesn’t control UN or US State Department, does he? They get their parts done without him just fine.
    Planning-wise? Soros may supply a handler for the new Big Sister, but Holdren published his project for Global Warming chicken coop back when it was called Global Cooling (in 1977).

  20. Reblogged this on Freedom Is Just Another Word… and commented:
    Good stuff!!

  21. So … does the boil rupture and drain outward, or does the infection overwhelm the defenses and destroy (or zombify) the host?

  22. Marxism is essentially one giant Ponzi scheme. RIght down to what happens when the loot doesn’t keep rolling in fast enough and it all comes apart. But like a Ponzi scheme, it sure looks attractive for a while. The one difference is nothinghttp://www.danmelson.com/ about marxism is optional.

    • Marxism is just a tool — set of slogans, with pseudo-scientific smoke and mirrors to make them look important. Those who actually buy it are minions, not masters.
      Yellow Tiger/Robespierre/Lenin/Pol Pot style wheel of “revolutionary justice”, as a power extraction and trade scheme? Yeah, it’s similar to a financial pyramid in a way. But doesn’t come apart as fast, unfortunately.

  23. A country with a GDP between 2 and 4% what the US had spent most of its money fomenting revolution.

    The late Dr. Jerry Pournelle at least once described the former Soviet Union economically as “Bulgaria with nukes” and that it was only their nuclear arsenal that made them a super power.

    I’ll also note I was looking into Heinlein’s estimate of the population of Moscow in one of the essays stemming from his trip to the Soviet Union. Most of the stuff I saw poo-pooed that estimate because it was an order of magnitude lower than the CIA’s estimate (per CIA Factbook). However, the Soviet Economist that came up with that 2-4% of the US’s GDP (per at least one article I saw) when told that the CIA’s estimate was an order of magnitude higher, stuck to his guns on the 2-4% figure.

    I’m going to trust the former Soviet economist in that, I think.

    And if the CIA can be that wildly wrong in one, I see no reason to believe they can’t be equally wildly wrong in the other.

  24. And yet, the insanity of communism, not that much different, propagated.

    When David Weber, in the Honor Harrington books had the Republic of Haven with it’s Committee of Public Safety and it’s “Citizen this” and “Citizen that” and political officers and all the rest, I thought he was doing a mashup of the French Revolution (Rob Pierre and Oliver Saint Just? really?). Later, I learned a bit about the French government between the Revolution and the rise of Napoleon and realized there was no mashup involved. It was a straight-up adaptation of post-Revolution France.

    Which indicates that there was lot of similarity between the two.

    • Yes. I caught that from the get-go, but then I had a grad class on French Revolution and Napoleon.

      I’d say that Marx studied the French Revolution (and Rousseau and Voltaire through Hegel), added it to the Industrial Revolution, half-baked it with some theory, and you know the rest.

      • I honestly can’t remember the exact context, but recently someone or other went totally apeshit on modern “kids” not quoting this or that revolutionary father (of the US) in his document….that opened when talking about how the French revolution was freaking awesome.

        So, k, you got folks who are teaching themselves from ground one.

        They go through foundational US writings.

        Then pick among those.

        They actually QUOTE from those.

        And then you gonna bitch ‘cus they’re not in line with the “hey yah this mass murder revolution is totes cool” thing?

        Seriously?

        • Most of the Founding Fathers and pro-French US folks changed their minds about the French style of revolution, when they saw what the French Revolution did. Also what they did to Lafayette, who was their friend, but who had to flee France to avoid execution.

          • Heck, his wife was rescued from the Terror only by some shenanigans by the Monroes — and both the Monroes and she fled French as soon as the release from prison was effected.

          • The first, oh, lets say 1789-late 1790 were the years when everything seemed to be going at least OK. Then came the Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the imprisonment of the king, and the first major warning signs of what would become the Terror. So I can understand 100% everyone—especially those far away from France—being excited about the Revolution for the first two years or so. After that? Especially after the Terror started? Nope.

            • Hmmmm … I’ve had relationships like that. Started out all nice and sensible and fun until person reached a comfort level to open up about what were the real turn-ons, fears and obsessions and I not only became concerned about ever sleeping in that person’s presence but being out in public with them.

        • The number of Conservatives who will pile up a 100 foot tall heap of soapboxes and rant about how kids these days don’t know anything about their country, and then immediately demonstrate profound ignorance of the basics themselves, is disturbing.

          I think the “we need to resist Socialism by requiring the Pledge of Allegiance” one is my favorite.

          • That one is probably more a matter of looking at current threats and their tactics, with an eye to fostering an effective counter using very limited options. Not ignorance.

            • That one *has* to be ignorance.

              Because if they knew where the pledge came from they wouldn’t be able to say that crap with a straight face.

              • Sure they could, because they’d know exactly what they mean, and don’t care that the original form was written by a “socialist minister.”

                Hell, if anything that’d be a great example of God working in mysterious ways.

                • “the original form was written by a “socialist minister.”” understates it.

                  Written by a socialist.

                  For explicitly collectivist reasons.

                  During the most hyper-totalitarian period of this country’s history.

                  Mysteriously changed when the other socialists that everyone looked up to got a little too embarrassing (that sounds familiar…).

                  And then promoted by blinkered idiots for, again, explicitly collectivist reasons.

                  And the “it’s a socialist indoctrination ritual” accusation is just the cherry on top. The real accusations get into the refusal to engage in state-worship.

                  • To sell US flags to schools.

                    And his idea of promoting socialism was “liberty and justice for all.”

                    Horrors!

                    • schools

                      ……are schools supposed to make it better? That it was mixed up with the school system is almost as damning as the collectivism and the state-worship combined.

                      And his idea of promoting socialism was “liberty and justice for all.”

                      Have you forgotten that Communism and all of it’s branches were sold as making everyone free and wealthy? That the branding turned out to be one of the worst lies in history doesn’t change what the branding was.

                    • You’re doing the “ignore the point and try to be mocking” avoidance behavior again.

                      You should probably read Chesterton’s “What I saw in America,” especially this part:
                      A man is perfectly entitled to laugh at a thing because he happens to find it incomprehensible. What he has no right to do is to laugh at it as incomprehensible, and then criticise it as if he comprehended it.
                      http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27250/27250-h/27250-h.htm

                    • I note, philosophically, that he found the questions about being a polygamist or an anarchist baffling, without noticing how they connected to the part about swearing under penalty of perjury that they are true. . . .

                    • Oh, true, but that wouldn’t’ve let him be funny and make a point!

                    • I avoided nothing…

                      You mention schools as a side point. I gave a short and snarky answer. I didn’t see any reason to drag out and itemize the entire evil mess that is the school system. I assumed that everyone here is well aware of that issue.

                      You say “And his idea of promoting socialism was “liberty and justice for all.””. I addressed that too. Without even a hint a snark.

                    • Sure thing, Drax.

                    • *snicker*

                      Let it not be said that I am without a sense of humor.

                    • “I have a terrific sense of humour, and it’s still in the original packaging!”

                  • Americans are great about stripping the toxic parts from such things, have been ever since Yankee Doodle.


                    What thee writer intended the pledge to mean has nothing to do with how Americans take it today.

              • Why? Just because Bellamy was a socialist?

          • *patpats* that’s nice

          • What it comes down to is that there are multiple meanings of “Conservative.” Most of us are really more reactionary than conservative, because we want to restore our current practice to what it was before leftism corrupted the system.

            But there are quite a lot of “conservatives” who merely want to keep things the way that they are, or perhaps just go back to the 50s or 60s. One of my favorite quotes is “The definition of an American tradition is anything a Baby Boomer grew up with,” and that’s what the defense of the Pledge comes down to. Same with Social Security and Medicare being untouchable entitlements.

      • … half-baked it with some theory,

        You forgot the candied fruits and nuts he added.

    • Yup I noticed that too. Given Manticore is rather British in its nature having a fallen France as its opposition is rather apropos. There is one book where Adm. Theisman is called back to Haven and he wipes out the last of Robt S Pierre’s (come on that wasn’t a flare tipped giveaway?). I figured Theisman was going to declare himself emperor and we were going to have Napoleon in space. Given Honor Harrington is an analog for the fictional Horatio Hornblower it would have made sense. But Mr Weber went other places with it after 20 some odd additional books :-). He is a wordy one Mr. Weber.

      • Esther McQueen was going to be Weber’s Napoleon, until he decided to go elsewhere with the series.

        • Yes she ends up counts in a Geiger counter along with the rest of the occupants of the Octagon (that’s not a spoiler, the books been out since the 90’s :-)). Her actions are more Napoleon like than Theisman’s but I was slow on the uptake and she was vaporized before I came to the conclusion about Haven ~= France. Ox May be slow but Rigellians aren’t too quick on the uptake either… I’ll go sit in the slow section with Orvan, he’s good company.

    • I caught on to the French Revolution connection while reading “Short Victorious War” but it wasn’t until “Flag in Exile” that I made the Pierre/Robespierre connection, when he signs off on Esther McQueen’s proposed plans as “Rob S. Pierre.” And then I suddenly got it, and groaned, and wondered why I hadn’t noticed earlier.

  25. most hopeful thing I’ve read in years. thanks, even if you’re wrong!

  26. Sad news:

    Gahan Wilson Dies: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
    Gahan Wilson, the famed author and cartoonist, has died in Arizona at the age of 89. Wilson had been battling dementia. A post on Wilson’s Facebook page said that Wilson passed away on November 21.

    Wilson will forever be remembered for his seminal work in publications such as The New Yorker and Playboy. His comic strip, “Nuts,” was a regular feature in National Lampoon.

    Here’s what you need to know:

    1. Wilson Was Surrounded by His Family as He Passed Away
    [SNIP]

    2. Wilson’s Wife, Nancy, Passed Away in 2019
    [SNIP]

    3. Wilson Was a Resident of the New York-Area for Many Years
    [SNIP]

    4. Wilson Was ‘Born Dead’
    Wilson told the Comics Journal in a 2011 interview that he was “born dead.” Wilson explained that when he was born, he was blue and not breathing. Wilson said the doctor put him in the sink. Shortly afterward, the same doctor noticed that Wilson looked as though he was stirring. Wilson told the website, “He was looking through the little porthole into the operating room and then burst in and grabbed me up. He used hot and cold water and slap, slap, slap. He got me coughing and puking and breathing and that’s that: I was alive.”

    Wilson added that, “The same thing happened to John Steinbeck. I could have spent some time in the afterlife before I was born.” A documentary that was made about Wilson’s celebrated his bizarre birth in the title, “Born Dead, Still Weird.”

    5. Wilson’s Is Being Celebrated as One of the Great American Cartoonists on Social Media
    [SNIP]

  27. Sarah

    We live in strange times because ordinary people have had enough of their elites, globalism and want a morefund localized politics. Nassim Nicholas Taleb protesting the corruption Lebanon has remarked that there’should a drive and desire for more local face to face relationso. So the revolts are a desire to return to the local.
    A return to the present national state and the crazy quilt of cities,region, etc.

    xavier

    • I have no idea what morefund is. HOWEVER and for the record, yeah, people have had enough of internationalism. But that was part of Marxism’s viral load as well as the resultant shock of WWI.
      I expect in Europe Nationalism will be ethnic. They lie to themselves about being genetically uniform. I think they’d already have gone boots and ovens if it werent’ for their lack of young people.
      I’m divided on this. On the one and their “guests” need a boot up the ass. On the other hand some, like the Turks TRIED to integrate and assimilate back in the eighties. On the third hand (shush) Europe is not reproducing enough to survive and if they pitch the baby with the bath water they’re going to be in trouble. BUT that’s their look out.
      In the US we NEED acculturation and assimilation and national confidence. We can’t afford to slice and dice by race. Even most American blacks have more white than African in them. The problem is not race, it’s culture. The culture of victimhood needs to go. The idiocy of saying only people all of whose ancestors were here at the time of the revolution can be Americans is… idiotic. Both my kids would qualify for scholarships from Daughters of the American Revolution, because their dad’s ancestor SERVED in the revolutionary army.
      However, even my husband wouldn’t be American by that standard. You’d end up with a couple thousand people, maybe, and most of them hard left.
      Demanding anglo-saxon ancestry would be fun too. I think I have more than most of the people doing the demanding. Wouldn’t that be FUN?
      Honestly, in the US we need to demand people assimilate and fit in. Fit in or Fuck Off. And yes, we need to look after national interests first. Because a representative form of government is NOT possible with internationalism or open borders. By definition it stops government having to serve those who elected it.

      • “On the other hand some, like the Turks TRIED to integrate and assimilate back in the eighties. ”

        Sarah, the problem with that is simple: there’s only one religion that encourages its’ members to treat any agreement with someone outside the faith as non-binding. There’s only one that says lying to non-believers is a religious duty.

        How do you trust that the assimilation is sincere? and even close to permanent? We’re seeing that here, with Kieth Ellison, Ilhan Omar, etc.

        • I get that. But honestly, the Turks were quite willing to abandon Islam, if needed. This isn’t seen here.
          Ilhan Omar doesn’t pretend to have assimilated. Nor does Keith Ellison. Nor for that matter does theoretically US born Occasional Cortex.
          Assimilation means assimilation not “we did it better back home.”
          It’s not hard to know what assimilation means. It was more or less ENFORCED in the early 20th century.
          Now? You have to fight to assimilate, or to keep your kids from being convinced the “old country” was better. I fought that shit for decades.

          • Recep Tayyip Erdoğan was Mayor of Istanbul from 1994 to 1998. In the Eighties Turkey was a secular nation, Attaturk’s heirs acting to prevent resurgence of Islamic nationalism until the Twenty-First century. Arguably it was Europe’s refusal to accept Turkey into the Common Market that pushed the Turk’s into the mosques.

          • You have to fight to assimilate, or to keep your kids from being convinced the “old country” was better. I fought that shit for decades.

            Teachers unions did all they could to obstruct “Hispanic” and “African-American” students from learning English, up to and including court challenges to ballot initiatives demanding English instruction as primary goal.

          • MAGA – Make AOC Go Away! (not original to me)

        • FYI I’m not making any claims that Muslim (or other) immigrants since the 80s have been forced or even encouraged to assimilate, here or in Germany.
          Those of us who have tend to be vocal about it, because we had to fight hard to do it.
          I’m claiming it’s not in any way, shape or form genetic. If you go after the genes, you’ll both get rid of a lot of people who fought hard to be as American as possible, and keep a MASSIVE fifth column. That would be… stupid.
          As for Europe, they’re going genetic and appearance. If they have enough people left for that battle. I wish them luck. They should have done it ten years ago.

          • On THAT, we agree. I simply want to point out that there are certain religions / cultures who cannot be presumed assimilated. Ever.

            • aye. And there’s critical mass. I oppose illegal immigration because it’s ILLEGAL, but even if we were getting equal numbers of LEGAL I’d be truly, truly, truly upset.
              You see, cultures are organic things. EVEN if we were assimilating as we used to, bringing in LARGE numbers of any culture — and btw, yes I know Latin countries are notoriously bad at sending in people who assimilate. There are some of us, but not a ton — will, in the long run change the culture. And usually change it to that they fled.
              I agree with you that Islam is notoriously hard to assimilate being a political system as much as a culture. There are others. Hell, at this point we shouldn’t be importing Europeans tainted by socialism, either, unless they can prove a record of fighting collectivists.
              Perhaps not a permanent moratorium on immigration for 30 years or so, but we SHOULD make the exceptions even spouses very well vetted. Because I love America and want it to BE America.

              • I oppose illegal immigration because it’s ILLEGAL

                *puts on hat labeled “Ornery Jackass”*

                I must point out that what The Law has to say on a matter has nothing to do with whether it is right or wrong. From time to time an individual law might do a flyby, but accidents will happen.

                And the people who not just “have some respect for the law”, but insist that The Law is The Law and if you don’t like it it must only be changed in the legislature? They have unwittingly admitted that if handed a pistol and an order they would shoot the jew in front of them. Probably feel bad about it later, but that won’t bring anyone back to life.

                • No. As a nation of laws, it’s stupid to bring in people who start by disrespecting the law.
                  Yes, I know all the other stuff, but all the same.

                • “They have unwittingly admitted that if handed a pistol and an order they would shoot the jew in front of them. Probably feel bad about it later, but that won’t bring anyone back to life.”

                  You, sir, are full of $hit. I admit no such thing. I will refuse the order AND TAKE THE PENALTY. It’s people who insist on cost free lawbreaking that have made our legal system non-functional.

                  • You just had the most black and white moral choice that it is possible to present to someone put before you, and flubbed it.

                    The correct answer, technically speaking, is to have never gotten into that situation in the first place. But one can’t avoid everything so that isn’t very helpful.

                    The correct answer is to take the pistol and shoot the guy giving you the order. Possibly you will then die in a hail of machinegun fire, but you already said you don’t care about penalties, and there is one less monster in the world.

                    It’s people who insist on cost free lawbreaking that have made our legal system non-functional.

                    That the left ignores any law they don’t like (which is all of them), doesn’t mean that a huge swath of our laws are worthy of respect. If it is the citizen’s duty to respect the law there must be an equivalent duty for the law to be something worthy of respect.

                    • 1. You didn’t present that alternative.
                      2. Refusing the order means refusing the order. How I refuse it doesn’t really matter, since it is the willingness to refuse it vs your claim it wouldn’t be refused.

                    • Selective enforcement is the mark of the Leftist. If you won’t enforce it against everyone, then there is no system of laws.

            • BTW it is because I assimilated (as much as it’s possible. There’s probably a good 5% that never will, but that’s reactions built in before the age of 3, and honestly it just means I tend to be louder and get angry easily. It COULD also be genetic.) that I oppose indiscriminate immigration. Acculturating is HARD. It’s like dying a little. Most people really don’t want to do it. And it takes time for the born-here kids to acculturate, even when we tried to make them do so. And that’s a big problem for a nation where we must most of us believe in the constitution to continue existing.

        • … there’s only one religion that encourages its’ members to treat any agreement with someone outside the faith as non-binding

          You’re talking Progressivism, right?

      • The problem is not race, it’s culture

        The problem is people incapable of — or unwilling to — distinguishing one from the other.

        Oddly enough, these are also the people condemning the culture that is the foundation of the American idea, who sneer at American Exceptionalism, declaring “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect that the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism”

        American exceptionalism does not derive from the idea that America is better than any other nation (although I would argue we are) but from the fact that America is the only nation conditioned on the principle of popular sovereignty, that the government is agent of the people and derives ts authority from their delegation.

  28. “Which is like turtles, only malevolent”

    Wait, what?

    • In joke. Don’t worry about it.

    • Also find snapping turtles. Definitely malevolent. Seriously cranky and peeved at a minimum. And big ones are down right scary. Big ones are not super slow, and their heads and LONG necks can move like lightning. 2-3′ back for every foot of shell length is the minimal safe distance.

      • Born and raised (and lived for 64 years) on the west coast. Wild turtles (and tortoises) invariably try to either escape or hide on contact with people.

        Move to the upper midwest a few years ago, and began to notice some slight differences in certain reptile behavior. Provided support for some friends’ kayaking on the Mississippi on a periodically very rainy day. Which rain seems to have encouraged some turtles to come out to scout around the area where I was waiting to help haul out the boats when they’d arrive. When I stepped out to get a better look at Mr. Shellback, it was the first time I ever saw a turtle notice me, turn toward me, and advance aggressively in my direction.

        Snappers is different.

  29. For what it’s worth, I hope and pray you’re right.

    • Well, the crystal ball is broken. And in any case,t here will be tough times ahead. We are at a nadir for so many things. BUT I hope G-d still protects fools, drunkards and the United States of America.

    • Did you see this?

      • *WOW*

        I think that might just be peak retard.

        • No, she even ascends higher when she concludes that thread:

      • Undoubtedly a shill for Big Life, the insurance conglomerate that has been profiting from people’s deaths for years.

        I fail to see how my having a life insurance policy will protect my children from being raped and sold into slavery.

  30. “well… the Russians always had dirt on people. That’s how they got all the aristocratic British spies.”

    I was under the impression that the well known aristocratic spies were true believers rather than blackmailed.

  31. A couple of China items. Both have links over at Instapundit (though it’s not where I initially saw the second item).

    First is that Hong Kong just had another election (they do still have those). There was a much larger than usual voter turn-out (I saw someone say that it was three times larger), and the pro-Beijing candidates came very, very close to getting swept. Now it’s anyone’s guess what the long-term effects of this will be, since Beijing has taken steps over the years to limit the power of any elected politician in Hong Kong. But if Xi were smart, he’d take this as an opportunity to back off of Hong Kong before he has to go into “make the population cower as we flatten the city” mode. The election results mean that he can point to that as the cause instead of the more fractious and rowdy “protestors” (who even sympathizers say are essentially just this side of open insurrection these days).

    Second is that Western businesses are apparently learning the hard way that their Chinese contacts are now essentially in “burn the bridges for short term profit, because there isn’t going to be a long-term profit” mode.

  32. We need to start a crowdfunding effort to get copies of The Gulag Archipelago in EVERY high school in the country. Maybe work through the state boards of education to put it on the Must Read list before graduation.

    But, yeah, let’s get discounted copies into the hands of kids, BEFORE they head off to college.

    • The kids would never be allowed to read it. The school bureaucrats would have them all boxed up and ‘put in storage’.

      I read an excerpt from The Gulag Archipelago in Grandma’s Readers Digest when I was around 14. Very disturbing. I remember thinking, ‘We beat the Nazis, but they’re still around’.

  33. If you want to get the kids to ingest that you need to make a streaming video of it. Accompanied by a MMORPG version.

    Maybe Trump could arrange a National Endowment of the Humanities grant for the production, if only to get the Left to denounce government funding of the Arts.

    • The above comment was supposed to have opened as a response to comment from Linda S Fox, November 25, 2019 at 9:44 am:

      We need to start a crowdfunding effort to get copies of The Gulag Archipelago in EVERY high school in the country.

      Thanks, WP, ya piece o …

  34. Despite Obama’s heroic efforts with preventing fracking, the US has become a major oil producer. And oil prices can no longer support Russia’s need for $$$ to foment communist (because it’s useful, and because most of the useful idiots abroad buy this shit) insurrection and (ultimate) Russian power.

    In a bit of serendipity I just finished the audio book version of The Absent Superpower: The Shale Revolution and a World Without America by Peter Zeihan after seeing the author give a talk. The whole point is with the fall of the USSR and energy self-sufficiency the real reason for the US to ensure the global trading system is collapsing just as Americans are ready for a new isolationism.

    While I think there are points where he’s a bit glib, but I consider it worth listening to. He lightly touches on the effects on Russia, although he’s more interested in demographics of Russia than oil prices effects.

    I remember all the peak oil talk a decade ago and that has disappeared. The importance of the Middle East to geopolitics is pretty much predicated on oil. Fracking is arguably the biggest change in geopolitics since the fall of the USSR, yet it isn’t even really discussed.

    • Oh, it’s discussed. The democrat candidates want to stop it tout de suite. But yeah, in implications and all, no, it’s not discussed.

      • Oh, I know the Dems are out to stop it.

        Which is proof that it isn’t discussed, because if the knock on effects were widely discussed then the Dems would be afraid to call for the end of it.

    • I remember all the peak oil talk a decade ago and that has disappeared.

      I paid no heed to the “peak oil” arguments at the time, having deemed the argument bollocks and those making it mistaken, dishonest and likely both. One thing I am absolutely confident about: nobody making that argument is likely to be held accountable in the public record for having been wrong.

      In fact, having been following political economics discussions for some fifty years now I cannot think of a single instance of any prognosticator paying a price for being wrong in the direction of increasing state power.

  35. “Think about it. They control government, education, news, entertainment (at least the traditional venues.) They propagated their narrative everywhere from the courts to your local newspaper.”

    Isn’t that fascism as defined by Mussolini?

  36. “possibly because we culturally (maybe genetically, but there’s no proof of that) ”

    I think there is genetic proof: Americans descend from those who left Europe and other oppressive countries to live free. We descend from innovators, freedom lovers, and malcontents. Our distrust of authority is based on our rebellion from unjust authority. It’s who we are…. or were.

    This is the main reason I don’t recognize the young people living here now. They don’t know their birthright and are attempting to trade it off for a free stuff orgy that will bind them tighter than chains and ultimately suck the life out of them.

    • deToqueville in “Democracy in America” makes a point of that. Americans, in particular the New Englanders of his day (writing in the 1830’s) descended from folk who were self-selected over more than two hundred years for self-government both small and local (the township being the central element of government), and to not being particularly responsive to far off kings. Whether that represented people born with the proclivity toward independence (thus genetic) or a convergence of cultures which became self-propagating is a bit of an open question but I suspect that it’s a bit of both.

      Unfortunately, a lot of that self-selection has fallen by the wayside in the ensuing centuries. And a lot of the cultural habits have been diluted–much by a deliberate effort to undermine them, an effort which gained considerable headway in the 20th century. That effort has been only partially successful (one of the cultural habits of Americans is a great deal of cussed stubbornness) but enough that I’m far less sanguine than some about the outcome of the “New American Revolution” that some seem to want. The “war” has been on a cultural plain and, I believe, that’s where it needs to be fought. Win the culture war (which we’ve barely begun to fight, to be honest) and we don’t need a full-on bullets and bombs war. (Which is not to say that there won’t be violence along the way–there’s already been some and I expect there to be more.)

      Fail to win the culture war and even if we win a bullets and bombs war, we lose.

      • “Whether that represented people born with the proclivity toward independence (thus genetic) or a convergence of cultures which became self-propagating is a bit of an open question but I suspect that it’s a bit of both.”

        How about anyone without the necessary physical and mental stability to survive at the end of a six month supply / communication lag removed that lack from the gene pool?

        We’ve removed the survival advantage of independence and replaced it with survival advantage in dependence and obedience to the Party.

      • OT: I’m having trouble approving comments. I approve them and they change back to pending in a couple of seconds.

      • And this comment, in somewhat expanded form, is going to be tonight’s blog post over on mine.

  37. Damn, Sarah, I am liking this heresy.

  38. Pingback: True but Forbidden #51: “Every smart person is smart enough to lie to themselves. “